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Re: 4,259 days: 9-11 NEVER FORGET
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From Wikipedia:

Holocaust trivialization is the metaphorical (or otherwise comparative) use of the word Holocaust. Numerous authors argue that such uses trivialize the meaning of the Holocaust, and many consider them offensive.[1] In the words of Holocaust survivor and memoirist Elie Wiesel,

    I cannot use [the word 'Holocaust'] anymore. First, because there are no words, and also because it has become so trivialized that I cannot use it anymore. Whatever mishap occurs now, they call it 'holocaust'. I have seen it myself in television in the country in which I live. A commentator describing the defeat of a sports team, somewhere, called it a 'holocaust'. I have read in a very prestigious newspaper published in California, a description of the murder of six people, and the author called it a holocaust. So, I have no words anymore.[2]


The Holocaust

The Holocaust [...] was the mass murder or genocide of approximately six million Jews during World War II, a programme of systematic state-sponsored murder by Nazi Germany, led by Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party, throughout German-occupied territory.[3][4]


Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

The atomic bombings of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan were conducted by the United States during the final stages of World War II in 1945. The two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. [...] Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects killed 90,000–166,000 people in Hiroshima and 60,000–80,000 in Nagasaki, with roughly half of the deaths in each city occurring on the first day. [...] In both cities, most of the dead were civilians, although Hiroshima had a sizable garrison.


Rwandan Genocide

The Rwandan Genocide was a genocidal mass slaughter of the Tutsis by the Hutus that took place in 1994 in the East African state of Rwanda. Over the course of approximately 100 days [...] over 500,000 people were killed, according to a Human Rights Watch estimate.[2] Estimates of the death toll have ranged from 500,000–1,000,000,[1] or as much as 20% of the country's total population.


September 11 attacks

The September 11 attacks [...] were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks launched by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda upon the United States in New York City and the Washington, D.C. area on September 11, 2001. [...]  In total, almost 3,000 people died in the attacks, including the 227 civilians and 19 hijackers aboard the four planes.