Please explain: Why this union is worth saving?

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Please explain: Why this union is worth saving?

Norman
We preach unity – we pit members against one another.
We call ourselves a brotherhood – we practice factionalism.
We call what we have a democracy – our union is run by an oligarchy.
We say we believe in justice – our union courts deny legal representation.
We demand fair wages and benefits – but not for nonunion workers.
We decry the abuses of big corporations – we give them special deals.
We’re against small nonunion shops – we refuse to contract with them.
We talk education – we wait forever for some classes.
We complain our jurisdiction is shrinking – we don’t teach many of our skills.
We’re big on looking for our union label – we don’t encourage buying union.
We contribute to political campaigns – we don’t appose the non-performers.
We talk community involvement – where is our political action training?
We value an informed membership – most of the council site is years old.
We value dialog – censored, then closed down the council feedback page.
We talk free speech – and allow outsider domination of our platforms.
We talk responsibility – and tolerate anonymity. (Is graffiti free speech?)
- - Now watch who responds to this and what they have to say - - Norman  
joe
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Re: Please explain: Why this union is worth saving?

joe
i agree with most of what you wrote, its pretty accurate. but that and 2.50 will get us on the subway. I am afraid if i go to a delegate or union meeting i will get arrested. I cant  listen to constant bullshit without speaking my mind.  you should run for office.
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Re: Please explain: Why this union is worth saving?

Ethics
In reply to this post by Norman
"" Watch who responds to this, and if it isn't Joseph A. Geiger or Steve McInnis promising how to fix everything, it isn't worth saving"" ( and then Norman is allowed to shed a single "Cherokee tear" )

"Confucius say, man who sneeze without tissue take matter into own hands"

Starting in 1980, something profoundly changed. It wasn’t just that big corporations and wealthy individuals became more politically potent, as Gilens and Page document. It was also that other interest groups began to wither.

Grass-roots membership organizations shrank because Americans had less time for them. As wages stagnated, most people had to devote more time to work in order to makes ends meet. That included the time of wives and mothers who began streaming into the paid workforce to prop up family incomes.

At the same time, union membership plunged because corporations began sending jobs abroad and fighting attempts to unionize. (Ronald Reagan helped legitimized these moves when he fired striking air traffic controllers.)

Other centers of countervailing power – retailers, farm cooperatives, and local and regional banks – also lost ground to national discount chains, big agribusiness, and Wall Street. Deregulation sealed their fates.

Meanwhile, political parties stopped representing the views of most constituents. As the costs of campaigns escalated, parties morphing from state and local membership organizations into national fund-raising machines.

We entered a vicious cycle in which political power became more concentrated in monied interests that used the power to their advantage – getting tax cuts, expanding tax loopholes, benefiting from corporate welfare and free-trade agreements, slicing safety nets, enacting anti-union legislation, and reducing public investments.

These moves further concentrated economic gains at the top, while leaving out most of the rest of America.

No wonder Americans feel powerless. No surprise we’re sick of politics, and many of us aren't even voting.

But if we give up on politics, we’re done for. Powerlessness is a self-fulfilling prophesy.  http://robertreich.org/

( Norman: Not all of the union labor organizations are in decline, not all of the suffer from "local 157's disease"- and by you pointing out the obvious, you just might be responsible for creating the spark necessary to light the needed fire)
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Re: Please explain: Why this union is worth saving?

steward
In reply to this post by Norman
stand up for what you belief in,this is called free speech,action in big numbers will get you results.we need to get  thousands involved and informed in order to succeed to our agenda to make our union better.weneed to get better benefits,more of our marketshare back,more friendly politicians on our side to speak in our behalve and get labor laws past to favor the union people.go after the1099 nonclassified workers and companys,fine them hard and make the workers pay back back taxis.it is not fair we all pay our taxis and other people benefit from this.laws and strict guidelines should be impleamented and put into place.Community board meetings with positive feedbackencouraging the public he job should be done union and it will be done ahead of deadline.it will be done safe and you will have bettwer contractors with a good union work force.speak up at your meetings,it could make a difference with a good idea to help improve our unions standards and attitudes to make things better for everybody,that includes the contractor,the members and our business agents.work productively,help one another out,remember when a member falls,pick him up and lead him under your torch.that is part what the brotherhood and sisterhood i s about,by sticking togerther,working togerther,and being a solid team will make us stronger,more visual,and better problem solvers.we are all in this togerther,please lets make each and everyone of us better and good union mem and women,this is the objective to succeeding over the nonunion foes.god bless the whole entire union,please lets all remain strong and proud of the gains we succeed in the unions history.