NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

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NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years 
02/09/2012
 By Pam Radtke Russell {enrconstruction.com}

The first new nuclear plant in the United States in more than 30 years got the final green light on Feb. 9, as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission authorized its staff to issue a construction and operating license for Georgia Power’s new nuclear units, Vogtle 3 & 4, near Waynesboro, Ga.

The NRC approval means the Shaw Group, Baton Rouge, La., and Westinghouse Electric Co., Pittsburgh, the joint venture engineering, procurement and construction contractor, can begin nuclear work at the plant. An NRC spokesman says the NRC staff would issue the license Feb. 10.  Southern Company and its partners have already spent about $4 billion on licensing and site work for the $14 billion units. They are expected to come online in 2016 and 2017 and each will supply 1,100 MW of electricity.

Shaw and Westinghouse have been conducting massive pre-construction activity since late 2008, building foundations for some buildings, and piecing together the containment vessel.

Some of the first nuclear tasks include construction of a large crane and moving the nuclear reactor into place, says Paul Bower, president and CEO of Georgia Power, the subsidiary of Southern Power that will own 45.7% of the new units. MEAG Power, Oglethorpe Power and the city of Dalton, Ga., will also have part ownership.

“Now you will see structures coming out of the ground and it will be amazing,” Bowers said during a news conference following the vote on Wed., Feb. 9.  With the COL, Shaw and Westinghouse can lay nuclear rebar and pour nuclear concrete. About 5,000 workers are expected on site during peak construction in late 2013.

The NRC approved the license on a 4-1 vote, with Chairman Gregory Jaczko dissenting. Jackzo says binding conditions related to last year’s Fukushima incident should have been attached to the license. “I cannot support issuing this license as if Fukushima never happened,” he said after the vote.

But the other commissioners said plans to address the Fukushima disaster were sufficient.

Tom Fanning, president of Southern Company, said during a conference call Feb. 9 that the new AP1000 design was better able to address concerns raised by Fukushima. “There will be issues that apply to the U.S. nuclear fleet, but they will apply much more to the existing fleet.”

On Feb. 8, nine environmental groups said they would seek a stay from the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia to prevent construction from proceeding at the Vogtle site. The groups, which include the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, said that the NRC should incorporate changes stemming from the review of Fukushima, into a license for Vogtle.

The plant is the first since 1978 to receive a construction license, and the first to receive a new combined construction and operating license.  In the last round of nuclear plants, construction and operating licenses were issued separately, often leading to required changes in design or construction as the plants were being built.

The NRC is reviewing 12 COLs to operate 20 nuclear units.

Another significant change is the modularization of the new nuclear plants. Shaw is building modules in Lake Charles, a., which it is shipping to the Vogtle site. The new nuclear designs also contain passive safety features, which allow for automatic shutdown without onsite power and very little additional water.

The Department of Energy and the Vogtle owners are negotiating the terms of an $8.33 billion loan guarantee for the plant, which Fanning said he expects will close in the second quarter of this year.

In addition to Southern, only South Carolina Gas and Electric is moving forward with significant preliminary work for new reactors -- two AP1000s at its V.C. Summer site in Jenkinsville, S.C.
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Point_Energy_Center

Indian Point, NY
_________________

In the near term, some of the nuclear plants which are approaching the end of thir useful lives will require permanent decommisioning and replacement.

Given the archaically slow processes at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the political contingent at the DC and other unionized trade coalitions need to start these conversations with NY State politicians, Mayor Bloomberg & Congressman. Ignoring the inevitable problems will not make them go away.

If Georgia can do it, I am certain that NY, with the political will and clarity of purpose and team partnering can certainly get these discussions moving forward. The UBCJA & NYCDCC should take the lead.
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
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NRC Sets New Safety Requirements for U.S. Nuclear Plants
{enrconstruction.com}
 
03/09/2012
 By Pam Hunter

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is directing virtually every commercial U.S. nuclear powerplant to meet new safety requirements, which the commission says it is putting in place as a result of lessons learned from Japan's  March 2011 Fukushima disaster.

The NRC, in a March 9 announcement, said it has instructed its staff to issue three orders to  operators of U.S. commercial nuclear reactors. The directives apply to all reactors currently operating or under construction, as well as to those planned and recently licensed at the Southern Nuclear Operating Co.'s Vogtle site in Georgia.

 - One of those orders requires plants to provide better protection for safety equipment installed after the Sept. 11, 2001,  terrorist attacks and also to obtain sufficient equipment to support all reactors at each site simultaneously.

 - The second order requires plants to install enhanced equipment for monitoring water levels in each facility's spent-fuel pool.

 - The third applies only to U.S. boiling-water reactors that have “Mark I” or “Mark II” containment structures. NRC is requiring those reactors to improve venting systems—or for the Mark II plants, install new systems—that help prevent or mitigate core damage in the event of a serious accident.

Plants have until Dec. 31, 2016, to complete modifications and requirements called for under all three NRC orders.

NRC Chairman Gregory B. Jaczko said, “The commission has taken a significant step forward on our post-Fukushima efforts. These orders reflect a tremendous effort on the part of the NRC staff to produce this comprehensive package in an expedited manner."

The commision also will issue requests for information to each operating U.S. commercial nuclear powerplant and certain provisions will apply to reactors under construction or recently licensed. For example, NRC will ask operators to carry out analyses of earthquake and flooding risks using up-to-date information.

The orders put into place the highest-priority recommendations of the agency’s Japan Near-Term Task Force, which issued a report last July.
 

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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

NO NUKES
NO NUKES SHUT EM DOWN !!!!!!!!!!  WE DON'T NEED A DISASTER LIKE FUKASHIMA TO HAPPEN HERE IN THE US !!!!!!!!!!
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
more Nuke's, Fewer Liberals.

Korg make fire, say Fire good, Korg learn make candle, Korg learn make gas lamp, Korg burn down many cities with gas lighting, Korg make electricity & light bulb, make switch, go on-off.

Korg make Hydro-Electric Plant, Liberals cry boo-hoo for fish, Korg make coal plant, Liberals cry stink. Korg learn make Nuclear Power Plant and more boo hoo. Liberals want to ban coal, oil and gas. Liberals Elect Obama, Obama kill light bulb, Obama end NASA, Obama de-fund Military, Obama make play money give to Liberal friends to make wind and solar power, Liberal's run away with money and produce zero capacity for U.S.A. power needs, Obama make Electric Car, car go on fire, Korg say, fire good!

Korg shut down all power plants, City go dark, Liberals cry some more.

When is the last time a Liberal invented anything (other than a do nothing job on the public doles for themselves?) FYI - Liberalism is a mental disorder.

We have the technology, materials and manpower to build whatever the heck we set our minds to accomplishing. We can do it safely, efficiently and better than anyone else, inclusive of seismic challenges and disposal & containment.

If you want to return to the cave or the middle ages, go live in Afghanistan or a similar place. You can leave the USA anytime you want, one way. You can renounce your citizenship & leave the passport with TSA or your way to whatever hellhole you end up in. No one will miss you & there will be a thousand people lining up to take your place in a nano-second.

Nuclear power is clean, safe and efficient. As current plants begin to age and approach the end of their useful life, we have to replace them.
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NO NUKES
Its time for you ted to move to fukashima and learn what it's all about. Get yourself a dose of radiation,watch your hair fall out ,and let us know how that cancer treatment is going. Then report back. Experiance it for yourself.
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
This post was updated on .
Fear of tsunami's on the East Coast....Liberalism mental disorder no. 603....I'll add it to the list.

The world is a scary place for Liberals. You can embrace life's challenges head on with a positive proactive attitude, or you can run and hide and live in fear. There are no guarantees in life. When life hands you a lemon, you make lemonade and move on.

Liberals want all the benefits of life without assuming any of the risk. Classic hypocrites. Kinda like the law passed in Boston, which banned pigeons from the Boston Common, pushed by Liberals - except, the liberals & legislature forgot to tell the pigeons.

More Nuke's - Fewer Liberals, all those in favor.....


http://395h.com/pics/displayimage.php?pid=46&fullsize=1
 
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NO NUKES
Non-Fear of nuclear disaster....Conservativism trajic flaw/mental disorder #1..... I'll add it to the list. The world is a great place to build a nuclear power plant , extract the profits from the taxpayers and leave them with a legacy of disater that can't be fixed or rectified. The stupidity of nuclear power is: let's build something we cannot control if a natural disaster hits. It is the true greed that pushes for nuclear power without a solution for disaster. The Nuke plant builder says :Hey, lets build a nuke plant and make a ton of money. The taxpayers are ripe for the taking. The nuke plant builder says: Don't worry a natural disaster will never happen in a million years, your crazy if you think it will happen. Well lo and behold the best planning, by the best scientist in the world could not prevent fukashima. In fukashima all the problems were solved they had though out contingency plans for everything. And you see the result, DISASTER.  Until there is a simple way to nutrualize radiation immediately ,nuclear power should not be used.  Classic conservative big business owners of nuclear power plant producers will sell you down the river for a profit. And thats exactly what the want build the plant take the money and run. And when disaster hits and millions are affected they look the other way and say : We could'nt have prevented that ,it's a natural disaster. Short sighted morons brlieve in nuclear power bottom line.
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

The Mad Scientist
In reply to this post by Ted
Re: "When is the last time a Liberal invented anything (other than a do nothing job on the public doles for themselves?) FYI - Liberalism is a mental disorder."

Ted -- Your ass is hanging out!

'Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and a long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" (now Edison, New Jersey) by a newspaper reporter, he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large teamwork to the process of invention, and therefore is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
[...]
Historian Paul Israel has characterized Edison as a "freethinker".[33] Edison was heavily influenced by Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason.[33]
[...]
Nonviolence was key to Edison's moral views, and when asked to serve as a naval consultant for World War I, he specified he would work only on defensive weapons and later noted, "I am proud of the fact that I never invented weapons to kill." Edison's philosophy of nonviolence extended to animals as well, about which he stated: "Nonviolence leads to the highest ethics, which is the goal of all evolution. Until we stop harming all other living beings, we are still savages."'


'Nikola Tesla [...] Serbian-American inventor, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer. He was an important contributor to the birth of commercial electricity, and is best known for developing the modern alternating current (AC) electrical supply system. His many revolutionary developments in the field of electromagnetism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries were based on the theories of electromagnetic technology discovered by Michael Faraday. Tesla's patents and theoretical work also formed the basis of wireless communication and the radio."'

"What has the future in store for this strange being, born of a breath, of perishable tissue, yet Immortal, with his powers fearful and Divine? What magic will be wrought by him in the end? What is to be his greatest deed, his crowning achievement?
Long ago he recognized that all perceptible matter comes from a primary substance, or a tenuity beyond conception, filling all space, the Akasha or luminiferous ether, which is acted upon by the life-giving Prana or Creative Force, calling into existence, in never ending cycles, all things and phenomena. The primary substance, thrown into infinitesimal whirls of prodigious velocity, becomes gross matter; the force subsiding, the motion ceases and matter disappears, reverting to the primary substance.
Can man control this grandest, most awe-inspiring of all processes in nature? Can he harness her inexhaustible energies to perform all their functions at his bidding? more still cause them to operate simply by the force of his will?
If he could do this, he would have powers almost unlimited and supernatural. At his command, with but a slight effort on his part, old worlds would disappear and new ones of his planning would spring into being. He could fix, solidify and preserve the ethereal shapes of his imagining, the fleeting visions of his dreams. He could express all the creations of his mind on any scale, in forms concrete and imperishable. He could alter the size of this planet, control its seasons, guide it along any path he might choose through the depths of the Universe. He could cause planets to collide and produce his suns and stars, his heat and light. He could originate and develop life in all its infinite forms."

-Man's Greatest Achievement by Nikola Tesla, New York American, 6 Jul 1930.


[And, if you think Tesla's 'occult ether physics' too far-out, consider the politics of the theoretical physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics.]

"I am convinced there is only one way to eliminate (the) grave evils (of capitalism), namely through the establishment of a socialist economy, accompanied by an educational system which would be oriented toward social goals. In such an economy, the means of production are owned by society itself and are utilized in a planned fashion. A planned economy, which adjusts production to the needs of the community, would distribute the work to be done among all those able to work and would guarantee a livelihood to every man, woman, and child. The education of the individual, in addition to promoting his own innate abilities, would attempt to develop in him a sense of responsibility for his fellow-men in place of the glorification of power and success in our present society."

Albert Einstein, Why Socialism?, 1949 [13]

Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by NO NUKES
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

NO NUKES
KEEP DREAMING TED     NO NUKES
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
In reply to this post by The Mad Scientist
Not exactly, your hero Obama just killed the prophet's chief invention for one that will cause untold harm & create disposal issues. Break a light bulb, sweep it up. Break a new one, call a hazmat team. Besides, given the prohibitve cost, it's a tax on the poor - right?

Liberalism Mental Disorder No. 1 - Everything is about Liberalism & the progressive, socialist, marxist & commie agenda - subversion from within ala Stalin. 

Inject yourselves into all topics & subject matters, invade the schools, colleges, universities and unions and brainwash the masses. The irony of all of it is in the fact that you call yourselves "progressives", when all you do is attack and destroy all that is good, and your policies and practices are "regressive".


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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

tester
...Fear of tsunami's on the East Coast ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohNsKV3FYT8&feature=related


The Melting Sun: Japan’s Nuclear Follies
“They (the Japanese power companies including TEPCO) are also seeking to extend the shelf life of their plants to 60 years, double what experts thought prudent when they built the plants. In the context of fewer and shorter inspections, and a record of falsifying safety reports, the implications are unsettling in light of the potential harm of an accident.”–August 24th, 2010, Jeff Kingston in Contemporary Japan: History, Politics, and Social Change Since The 1980s

http://www.japansubculture.com/2012/03/the-melting-sun-japans-nuclear-follies/





Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
In reply to this post by Ted
http://www.clipsyndicate.com/video/playlist/642/3333858?title=enrtv

VERMONT YANKEE wins Federal Approval to continue operating plant for another 20-years, State Permit expires in 2-weeks...

Can you say.........Federal Pre-emption, Obstructing Interstate Commerce, National Energy Policy etc. The Lib's will try to shut it down, proffering their candle making abilities or whatever other lame excuse they can come up with, but will ultimately lose in the end as the Nation needs the power.
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
In reply to this post by Ted
In a Test of Technology, the Largest-Ever Fusion Reactor Rises in France
{enrcnstruction.com}
03/26/2012
 By Peter Reina
Text size: A A

 [ Page 1 of 2 ]

Photo by Peter Reina for ENR

The roughly 80-m-tall Tokamak building will rise from 493 seismically isolated foundation plinths.

Illustration Courtesy ITER

Twenty-five magnets, each up to 25 meters in diameter, will wrap around the 5,000-tonne toroidal vacuum chamber along vertical and horizontal axes to contain a plasma of hydrogen isotopes at around 150 million degrees C to fuse atomic particles and release energy.
----- Advertising -----
 
With no time to wait for esoteric designs for the largest-ever nuclear fusion reactor to take final shape, engineers are pushing ahead with $1.3 billion worth of building and infrastructure construction at a plant site in Cadarache, France.

Urgent work to finalize relatively mundane wall-and-slab design fits uneasily with project development by teams spread around the globe for the experimental Tokomak magnetic containment device, which is at the center of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program.

While Tokomak is in development, construction staff are "like a snowplow driving information out of the other [design] teams," says Christophe Junillon, director of Engage S.A., the architect-engineer joint venture for the facility's 39 buildings and infrastructure. Engage includes WS Atkins plc., London; Empresarios Agrupados S.A., Madrid, and the Paris-based French firms Assystem S.A. and Iosis/Egis S.A.

Since Engage started work in April 2010, crews have leveled the 42-hectare site and completed a 257-meter-long assembly facility for magnetic coils. The Tokamak building's foundations are nearly finished.

The main civil and building construction contract covering the entire facility "has to be signed at the end of this year or the start of 2013," says Laurent Schmieder. He is project manager for buildings and infrastructure at Barcelona-based Fusion for Energy, the European Union's organization charged with delivering the ITER program.

With backing from China, Russia, South Korea, India, the European Union and the U.S., the project is under the overall control of ITER Organisation, Cadarache. Because financial support is both in cash and in kind, the final cost is not precisely known but is estimated at around $20 billion, says spokesman Aris Apollonatos. The EU has committed $8.6 billion.

The ITER Organisation aims to take fusion research a leap forward from the much smaller Joint European Torus machine that has operated at Culham, England, since the 1980s.

Fusion power involves releasing atomic energy by combining hydrogen isotopes in a plasma at temperatures around 150 million degrees C. The plasma is contained by strong magnetic fields within a toroidal magnetic chamber, from which the Russian acronym "Tokamak" is derived.

Scaling Up
While fusion has been shown to work at under 20 MW of power generation, scientists remain uncertain about scale effects at the 500-MW facility planned for ITER. They hope that 20 years' worth of research at Cadarache, about 40 miles northeast of Marseille, will generate enough information for a demonstration machine to be developed in Japan.

Before fusion science can move on, the Cadarache site must be ready for transfer in 2018, with installation of mechanical components starting three years before, says Engage's Junillon.

Valued at $195 million, the joint venture's eight-year design-supervise contract is said to be the largest of its type in Europe. In addition to infrastructure, it includes concrete-framed buildings with a combined footprint of 21,000 sq m and steelwork structures covering another 29,000 sq m, says Schmieder.

"We started [design] from scratch, generating a team of 130 guys," says Peter Sedgwick, an Atkins manager who is Engage's head of design. Within five months, by September 2010, the team had produced about 800 drawings and 200 reports, he adds. Bid design documents were ready last June.
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
In reply to this post by Ted
In a Test of Technology, the Largest-Ever Fusion Reactor Rises in France
{enrcnstruction.com}
03/26/2012
 By Peter Reina
Text size: A A

 [ Page 1 of 2 ]

Photo by Peter Reina for ENR

The roughly 80-m-tall Tokamak building will rise from 493 seismically isolated foundation plinths.

Illustration Courtesy ITER

Twenty-five magnets, each up to 25 meters in diameter, will wrap around the 5,000-tonne toroidal vacuum chamber along vertical and horizontal axes to contain a plasma of hydrogen isotopes at around 150 million degrees C to fuse atomic particles and release energy.
----- Advertising -----
 
With no time to wait for esoteric designs for the largest-ever nuclear fusion reactor to take final shape, engineers are pushing ahead with $1.3 billion worth of building and infrastructure construction at a plant site in Cadarache, France.

Urgent work to finalize relatively mundane wall-and-slab design fits uneasily with project development by teams spread around the globe for the experimental Tokomak magnetic containment device, which is at the center of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program.

While Tokomak is in development, construction staff are "like a snowplow driving information out of the other [design] teams," says Christophe Junillon, director of Engage S.A., the architect-engineer joint venture for the facility's 39 buildings and infrastructure. Engage includes WS Atkins plc., London; Empresarios Agrupados S.A., Madrid, and the Paris-based French firms Assystem S.A. and Iosis/Egis S.A.

Since Engage started work in April 2010, crews have leveled the 42-hectare site and completed a 257-meter-long assembly facility for magnetic coils. The Tokamak building's foundations are nearly finished.

The main civil and building construction contract covering the entire facility "has to be signed at the end of this year or the start of 2013," says Laurent Schmieder. He is project manager for buildings and infrastructure at Barcelona-based Fusion for Energy, the European Union's organization charged with delivering the ITER program.

With backing from China, Russia, South Korea, India, the European Union and the U.S., the project is under the overall control of ITER Organisation, Cadarache. Because financial support is both in cash and in kind, the final cost is not precisely known but is estimated at around $20 billion, says spokesman Aris Apollonatos. The EU has committed $8.6 billion.

The ITER Organisation aims to take fusion research a leap forward from the much smaller Joint European Torus machine that has operated at Culham, England, since the 1980s.

Fusion power involves releasing atomic energy by combining hydrogen isotopes in a plasma at temperatures around 150 million degrees C. The plasma is contained by strong magnetic fields within a toroidal magnetic chamber, from which the Russian acronym "Tokamak" is derived.

Scaling Up
While fusion has been shown to work at under 20 MW of power generation, scientists remain uncertain about scale effects at the 500-MW facility planned for ITER. They hope that 20 years' worth of research at Cadarache, about 40 miles northeast of Marseille, will generate enough information for a demonstration machine to be developed in Japan.

Before fusion science can move on, the Cadarache site must be ready for transfer in 2018, with installation of mechanical components starting three years before, says Engage's Junillon.

Valued at $195 million, the joint venture's eight-year design-supervise contract is said to be the largest of its type in Europe. In addition to infrastructure, it includes concrete-framed buildings with a combined footprint of 21,000 sq m and steelwork structures covering another 29,000 sq m, says Schmieder.

"We started [design] from scratch, generating a team of 130 guys," says Peter Sedgwick, an Atkins manager who is Engage's head of design. Within five months, by September 2010, the team had produced about 800 drawings and 200 reports, he adds. Bid design documents were ready last June.


 [ Page 2 of 2 ]


The designers did the usual kind of soil surveys but went a step further by also carrying out "finite differences" modeling to assess the potential impacts of finding undiscovered dissolved limestone voids, says Sedgwick.

A key element in the Tokomak building design was to demonstrate to nuclear regulators that the concrete structure could be sufficiently crack-free to contain leaks of contaminated gases, says Sedgwick. In the absence of design codes, "it is not a given that the concrete structure will provide [adequate] confinement," he says. A stainless-steel lining is being used where there is a risk of liquid spills.

Concrete work in the Tokamak building's 80-m by 115-m basement, which is about 16 m deep, is due for completion in the next few months, says Schmieder. Rising from the pit's 1.5-m-deep slab are 493 concrete plinths to support the Tokamak building. The 1-m by 1-m plinths rise to 1.7 m and are topped with elastomeric bearings for seismic isolation.

While the Tokamak basement heads to completion, Fusion for Energy is negotiating the main building and civil contract with four groups using the EU's competitive dialogue approach, says Schmieder. French contractors Bouygues S.A., Eiffage S.A. and Vinci S.A. are leading three bidding teams, while Grupo Ferrovial, Madrid, heads the fourth.

Some teams have submitted offers below the global maximum contract value of $330 million set by Fusion for Energy, and others are "very close," says Schmieder.

Because of the evolving nature of the concrete work, that element of the design will be on a unit-cost basis, says Schmieder. Steelwork, which is further along in design, will be billed on a lump-sum basis, he adds.

Also, Fusion for Energy is negotiating a contract worth up to $63 million for two 750-tonne-capacity cranes and an elevator equal in size to a double-decker bus to handle maintenance at Tokamak. The third big contract under procurement, valued up to $325 million, covers the site's mechanical and electrical equipment.

As construction of the Tokamak building draws closer, the team is under increasing pressure to stem the flow of requirement changes from engineers around the world, says Sedgwick. "We put in a team of 10 mechanical engineers who speak the same language as the process guys," he says.

To help manage conflicting requirements, the design teams are using CATIA 3D modeling software, which Sedgwick says is unusual for this type of project. "It's primarily a mechanical engineering project, and we are providing a building for it," Sedgwick adds.
 

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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Hanford kid
In reply to this post by Ted
Re: 'Not exactly, your hero Obama just killed the prophet's chief invention for one that will cause untold harm & create disposal issues. Break a light bulb, sweep it up. Break a new one, call a hazmat team. Besides, given the prohibitve cost, it's a tax on the poor - right?

Liberalism Mental Disorder No. 1 - Everything is about Liberalism & the progressive, socialist, marxist & commie agenda - subversion from within ala Stalin.

Inject yourselves into all topics & subject matters, invade the schools, colleges, universities and unions and brainwash the masses. The irony of all of it is in the fact that you call yourselves "progressives", when all you do is attack and destroy all that is good, and your policies and practices are "regressive".'


Ted:

Transfer your card, pack-up the belongings, and move to NYC; put that misguided expertise, conscience, and passion to work. You really waste precious time playing victim in 'extinction of the white race'/survivalist compound crisis mode. Without equivocation: liberals and conservatives are equally to blame; they are two sides of the same coin, Democrats and Republicans both ultimately defend economy of greed.

Comparing toxic light bulbs to Fukushima, or Obama to Stalin, is disingenuous, and does a lot to detract from all the relevant work that you do do. As an ideologue of competition, or meritocracy, wouldn't you say those so-called Marxists (supposedly) took over the academy because they could, and so be it? It appears that your elitism and their elitism are different varieties of the same stock.

You've said the UBC Constitution is toilet paper. As a true unionist, how would you re-write the below section?

OUR PRINCIPLES

We recognize that the interests of all labor are identical regard-less of occupation, sex, nationality, religion, or color, for a wrong done to one is a wrong done to all. We oppose all unlawful discrimination and harassment against workers, whether based on race, gender, nationality or any other basis. We object to prison contract labor because it puts the criminal in competition with honorable labor for the purpose of cutting down wages, and also because it helps over-stock the labor market.


Would you eat fish caught downstream from a nuclear reactor? Would you buy a house next door? If not, then the working-class poor, who for lack of education neither know nor can afford better, are recipients of such toxic largesse. But according to ideology you promulgate on this blog, they by nature are deserving.        

 

   
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
Oh come on now, save the bio-gas,solar & windfarm hype for someone else.  

How many trees, bunny rabbits, squirrels and birds are being harmed by the 100-acre solar farm? How many facilities such as this would it take to power Manahattan?  The earth proportionally does not have that much land now; does it? How many Greenpeace tree huggers will show up protesting for the trees and animals harmed?

Is this facility penance for Apple, given all the harm to people & the environment caused by their manufacturing processes? Apple abuses the poor, not I, nor do I advocate it, so save the spin and twisting of facts. You'd have way more fun protesting that, say an Occupy Apple movement down in good ole N.C. While you are in the hood, you could stop by Tennessee & write Al Gore a check for your Carbon Credits.

In the interim, we need viable energy sources.
______________________________
Apple Apparently Moving Away From the Grid To Power Its Data Center in North Carolina{enrconstruction.com}
Jack Buehrer
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Rendering courtesy of Apple
Lights On Maiden, N.C., data center will draw power from a 20-MW solar farm and 5-MW fuel-cell installation.
Related Links:
EDITORS' CHOICE & GREEN PROJECT: Facebook Data Center
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Apple is hoping to get a boost from the sun to power its rapidly growing cloud services.

Having completed a $1-billion, 500,000-sq-ft data center in Maiden, N.C., in late 2011, the computing giant recently began construction on a 20-MW solar farm. Along with a new 5-MW fuel-cell installation, the company plans to use the farm to supply all the energy needed to run the facility.

The data center, which was constructed to house the servers that drive the company's iCloud service, has drawn sharp criticism from Greenpeace and other environmental groups for thus far using coal and other non-renewable energy sources to power the facility. The solar farm will be built over 100 acres across the street from the data center and will supply 42 million kWh of renewable energy per year.

Apple declined to discuss the project when contacted by ENR. However, in a statement contained in its 2012 facilities report, the company says the solar farm will be the nation's "largest end user-owned, onsite solar array."

Also in the report, Apple said the fuel-cell installation, which is set to be operational by the end of 2012, will be the country's largest "non-utility" fuel-cell installation. It will be powered 100% by biogas, producing more than 40 million kwh of energy per year.

The completed data center earned a LEED-Platinum certification by the U.S. Green Building Council after its completion last year.

"We know of no other data center of comparable size that has achieved this level of LEED certification," the company said in a statement.

The solar and fuel-cell installations are part of a flurry of activity that has been ramping up at the site in recent weeks. On March 6, Atlanta's Holder Construction, the lead contractor on all of Apple's work at the Maiden site, was granted separate permits for erosion control and storm-water grading.

Holder also received a permit for a "non-occupied equipment building." It is not clear if those permits are related to the solar and fuel-cell installations or for additional construction on the site. According to a Charlotte Observer report, Apple's original plan for the Maiden site specified two identical data-center facilities. So far, only one has been built.

Representatives from Holder did not return messages seeking comment.
Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
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{enrconstruction.com - story not fact cjecked by enr}

NRC Chief Promises Tough Probe at Calif. Nuke Plant
04/06/2012
 Associated Press/AP Online
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By MICHAEL R. BLOOD

DANA POINT, Calif. - Following a tour of the troubled San Onofre nuclear plant, the chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission says the plant will remain offline indefinitely until the cause of unusual tube wear in the plant's steam generators is determined.
 
Gregory Jaczko promised a thorough probe of suspect tubing Friday and said there will have to be a "clear understanding" of the cause of the problem before either of the twin reactors is restarted.
 
The reactors at the plant located between San Diego and Los Angeles have been shut down for more than two months.
 
Jaczko says there is no timetable to restart the plants but left open the possibility that Unit 2 could be restarted more quickly.
 
He made his comments after a tour of the plant with Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif.
 
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.
 
The twin reactors at the San Onofre nuclear plant have been sidelined, more than 300 tubes that carry radioactive water will be scrapped because of excessive wear, and investigators are trying to figure out why tubing is rattling inside the lungs of the plant - its massive steam generators.
 
How sickly is San Onofre?

The chief of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will get a firsthand look Friday, at a time when some officials in nearby communities have been calling for the plant to shut down permanently because of safety concerns.
 
NRC Chairman Gregory Jaczko, joined by Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., will meet with plant managers and discuss the issues of the steam generators, where hundreds of tubes have shown unexpected wear, agency spokesman Victor Dricks said.
 
The visit to the seaside plant, located between San Diego and Los Angeles, comes 10 days after the NRC announced that San Onofre will remain dark until operator Southern California Edison fixes the widespread problem with tubing that carries radioactive water.
 
The high-profile trip also underscores the concern inside the federal agency tasked with ensuring the safe operation of the nation's commercial nuclear industry.
 
SCE has assured its customers that the reactors will not be restarted until it is safe to do so, and no date has been set.
 
State energy officials have warned of rotating blackouts in the power-hungry region if a heat wave hits while the plants are offline - San Onofre can power 1.4 million homes.

[the Tree Huggers get what they deserve,...Candles! Oh, and Enron is gone, so you can't blame them. Edison needs to schedule more Maintenance Shutdowns and keep the Plant's online, but good luck with that given the election of Governor Whacko -Jerry Brown. It's time for California to replace its two nitwit Senators (Boxer & Feinstein) with, dare I say - men with brains.]
 
The troubles began to unfold in late January, when the Unit 3 reactor was shut down as a precaution after a tube break in one of the generators. Traces of radiation escaped, but officials said there was no danger to workers or neighbors.
 
Unit 2 was taken offline earlier that month for routine maintenance and refueling. But investigators later found unusual wear on tubing in both units. The company has said 321 tubes that were heavily damaged will be plugged and taken out of service at the two reactors, well within the margin to allow them to keep operating.
 
Gradual wear is common in such tubing, but the rate of degradation at San Onofre has been unsettling to officials since the equipment is relatively new - the generators were installed in a multimillion-dollar makeover in 2009 and 2010.
 
The plant's four steam generators each contain nearly 10,000 alloy tubes that carry hot, pressurized water from the reactors. The tubes are a critical safety barrier - if one or more break, there is the potential that radioactivity could escape into the atmosphere. Also, serious leaks can drain cooling water from a reactor.
 
Several environmental groups issued statements urging the chairman to take the strongest possible action and determine the root of the problem before even considering a restart.
 
"Something has gone seriously wrong at the nuclear plant and the way in which Edison conducted itself," Gene Stone of Residents for a Safe Environment said in the statement. "If the Nuclear Regulatory Commission wants any credibility in this town, they need to know they can't sweep shoddy equipment and radiation leaks under the rug."
 
Last week, a report commissioned by another environmental group, Friends of the Earth, claimed the utility misled the NRC about design changes that it said are the likely culprit in excessive tube wear.
 
The plant is owned by SCE, San Diego Gas & Electric and the City of Riverside. The Unit 1 reactor operated from 1968 to 1992, when it was shut down and dismantled.

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Ted
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Re: NRC Approves Vogtle, First Nuclear Plant License in 30 Years

Ted
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Construction Week - Late Breaking Industry News
{enrconstruction.com}

05/21/2012
Edited by Tim Grogan
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Disputed Rebid of New Orleans Flood Project Upheld by Judge

A U.S. Court of Claims judge has ruled the Army Corps of Engineers can resume its rebid of a large flood-control project contract in New Orleans that was interrupted last November, when the winning joint venture, CBY, sued to halt the rebid. The court says the document is under seal, but an attorney for a losing competitor, PCCP, confirmed the May 11 ruling by Judge Victor Wolski. "We are obviously pleased," Neil O'Donnell, attorney for PCCP, told ENR on May 15. The Corps, which began the reprocurement last fall after the losing bidders successfully protested the original $675-million award to CBY, did not say how the process would restart.


Federal Buildings To Be Linked In Energy Management Network

The U.S. General Services Administration awarded a contract to IBM on May 14 to develop software and build a network system of advanced energy-management technology in 50 of the highest energy-consuming buildings in the GSA's inventory. IBM is to develop a system to monitor GSA building performance nationwide and stream data to a central facility, allowing faster energy-use analysis. Development of the system—which GSA will own—and integration of the first 50 buildings is set for completion within 12 months at a cost of $8.5 million. Integration of the next 50 is expected to take another year and cost an additional $3.5 million. Projected annual energy cost savings from the two phases is $11 million.

Georgia Nuke Projects Save$1 Billion in Financing Costs

Georgia Power Co. is on a roll. In December, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the Westinghouse AP1000 pressurized-water reactor for U.S. applications. In February, the company received a combined construction- and-operating license for two 1,100-MW AP1000 reactors, to be added to the Vogtle plant site in Waynesboro, Ga. On May 9, the utility informed the Georgia Public Service Commission that, by locking in financing at historically low interest rates, it will reduce costs for the project by $1 billion. With 45.7% ownership of the project, Georgia Power's total cost is now estimated to be $6.08 billion, or $28 million less than the certified amount.

East African Hydro ProjectGets OK for a 2013 Start

Construction of a $360-million hydropower project in East Africa, funded by the World Bank, is set to start up in mid-2013. The 80-MW plant will serve the East African countries of Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi. The plant was designed by SNC-Lavalin International, with the transmission infrastructure being designed by Fichtner-RSWI. The project was to start in 2009 but was held up by financing delays and negotiations with local residents. The three countries have now resolved the issues. The work includes $224 million for hydroelectric power generation, $77 million for power distribution, $49 million for "social mitigations" and $10 million for "institutional enhancement." Contractor procurement is under way.


Tolls Proposed To Finance New Bridge Over the Ohio River

The governors of Kentucky and Ohio both support tolls to fund a new bridge over the Ohio River at Cincinnati. The Brent Spence Bridge, a 48-year-old span with narrow lanes, carries Interstates 71 and 75 across the river. Replacement proposals call for a $2.4-billion, double-decked structure. Gov. Steve Beshear (D-Ky.) and Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) each favor imposing tolls to pay for a new bridge and accelerating construction to a 2014 start from a 2016 start.

Keywords: GSA; Smart Building; Nuclear; Hydroelectric; Africa; Natural Gas; Pipelines
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Public & Private Developers and Project Owners shall also look to capitalize on the still historically low interest rates to finance projects. Permit activity is increasing and will continue to do so, so owners can lock in the rates before the inevitable increase sure to follow
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