Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

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Questions Arise About Builder's Work on Bay Bridge Foundation

05/27/2012
 The Sacramento Bee
Text size: AA



SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- A builder of the new San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge failed to disclose that a 19-foot section of concrete in the foundation of the span's signature tower had not hardened before it was tested. By keeping quiet about the problem, the builder prevented further examination or repair.
 
The Sacramento Bee found descriptions of the apparent defect in records provided by Caltrans last fall to reassure the public about the overall stability of the suspension segment of the bridge's eastern span. Experts said the problem, combined with other construction and testing lapses by the California Department of Transportation and its contractors, raises new questions about the structural integrity of the bridge.
 
Kiewit-FCI-Manson, a joint venture, built the foundation as part of a $177 million contract. It did not provide the problematic 2007 test results until after a Bee investigation in November showed that a Caltrans employee skipped required test preparation for separate checks of the same foundation and fabricated results on other structures.
 
The agency plans to open the $6.5 billion structure, the costliest public-works project in state history, by Labor Day 2013 to an estimated 100 million drivers annually. Caltrans said the bridge is sound and can withstand any anticipated earthquake.
 
Beyond the large area of suspicious concrete in one of the reinforced underground foundation piles, a Bee examination of Caltrans records found numerous other problems with the piles, and gaps in essential data. Experts who reviewed concrete and engineering records for The Bee questioned the ability of the main tower foundation to resist an extreme earthquake -- the reason for building the new bridge.
 
Among The Bee's findings:

Two of 13 piles that rise out of the Bay to hold up the tower contain suspect and inadequately tested concrete. Sonic-wave tests revealed a 19-foot section of poor concrete in Pile 3, in a location subject to profound seismic forces. When tested, the concrete had not hardened to the required strength. It was not retested. For unclear reasons, Pile 8 either received no sonic test or builders could not locate the test report. Jobsite inspection diaries also show construction abnormalities in that pile.
 
Sonic test reports contained more than 20 errors. Among other slips, they misstated which piles were tested, test dates and pile measurements. Experts said the unusual volume of mistakes casts doubt on the reliability of testing for both the problem pile -- Pile 3 -- and others deemed free of defects.
 
Builders treated the piles with an additive meant to increase concrete strength, but known to cause soft or poor-quality concrete when overused -- one possible explanation for the 19-foot anomaly. Although batching computers should ensure mixing precision, records for a different pile show unexplained mixing errors by a concrete plant computer.
 
Caltrans and its experts said the bridge is safe. Many of their supporting assertions were contradicted by agency documents. For example, a Caltrans panel asked to review the work said sonic tests proved that the piles were of sound construction, despite the Pile 3 problem and the lack of testing for Pile 8. Panelists relied heavily on tests of what they called "full scale" mock-ups. Those models actually were a small fraction of the bridge piles' size. Independent experts said the mock-ups offered invalid comparisons.
 
Larry Olson, president of Olson Engineering, based in Wheat Ridge, Col., which conducted the sonic tests, declined to comment without permission from Kiewit Corp., based in Omaha. Neb. Kiewit referred all questions to Caltrans.
 
Olson Engineering detected the problem concrete in Pile 3 in 2007, calling it "a batch of concrete that has not fully set at the time of testing" or "a very poor area of concrete." The company suggested new sonic tests. None was conducted, according to Caltrans.
 
"The most likely cause for the (19-foot) anomaly is concrete that didn't cure," or harden, said Les Chernauskas, general manager of Geosciences Testing and Research Inc., a Massachusetts company that specializes in sonic testing. Chernauskas, who examined hundreds of pages of technical documents for The Bee, co-authored a seminal paper used to develop standards adopted by Olson and most similar companies.
 
Through a spokeswoman, California Gov. Jerry Brown declined to answer questions about whether Caltrans has kept his office informed of ongoing concerns about the bridge, or if the agency enjoys his confidence for its construction and testing oversight. The Governor's Office deferred all questions to Caltrans.
 
Rather than provide engineers or executives for an interview, Caltrans spokeswoman Tamie McGowen responded in writing to Bee questions. "Substantial evidence," including tests of the small mock-ups and the other bridge piles, indicates that the abnormal concrete in Pile 3 eventually hardened properly, she wrote.
 
"We are confident in the structural integrity of the main tower foundation and that the bridge will perform as designed to handle an extreme earthquake," McGowen said. A panel of engineering experts hired by the agency to re-evaluate the safety of the foundation concurred.
 
Chernauskas expressed skepticism about that conclusion. No one knows if the problem section ever hardened to its required strength, he said, because of the failure to retest.
 
"The way that they conducted the testing program, and the results, do raise some serious issues with respect to the quality of the concrete," said a university professor and expert in deep foundation testing, who also reviewed the documents at The Bee's request. He spoke anonymously for fear of jeopardizing business relationships with contractors for Caltrans, among the nation's largest public-works funders. A chief concern, he said, involves the absence of sonic data for Pile 8 and the location of problem concrete in Pile 3, toward the top of the pile, "subject to the most significant loads during an earthquake."
 
"If you had (two) out of 13 piles with major zones of defective concrete," the professor said. "(It) could result in a very large movement of that tower in an earthquake...How that would affect the performance of the bridge structurally is a big question mark. No matter what anyone tells you, no one can answer that question without doing some very rigorous analysis."
 
Using computer modeling, "you simulate the potential defects and see whether that would have any impact on the overall system," said Cumaraswamy Vipulanandan, an internationally known deep-foundation expert at the University of Houston, as a way to test "how much the factor of safety in the design would be reduced."
 
Getting to structures beneath a mammoth 525-foot tower might require drilling through the bridge footing to extract core samples -- a significant engineering challenge. But Chernauskas, Vipulanandan and the other professor who reviewed the data said such an effort might be vital to determine whether the bridge could stand up to the most extreme earthquake.
 
Kiewit built the Bay Bridge piles in 2006 and 2007 and had relatively little experience with this kind of deep foundation. It had struggled on previous jobs, according to Caltrans records obtained by The Bee
 
Kiewit began building foundations for the Benicia-Martinez Bridge shortly before taking on the Bay Bridge project. Records show that Caltrans engineers recommended rejection of nearly all the Benicia piles built before awarding the Bay Bridge contract to the Kiewit joint venture. Those piles, almost one-third of the Benicia job, were deemed either too flawed for use without repair or required retesting due to construction errors. After Caltrans awarded Kiewit the Bay Bridge contract, engineers similarly recommended rejection for more than 80 percent of the remaining Benicia piles.
 
Soon after the Bay Bridge sonic testing, Kiewit-FCI-Manson provided Caltrans with results for six of the 13 piles. They showed only minor problems. It failed to deliver the other sonic reports, including one showing the huge anomaly. Caltrans did not request those tests, McGowen said, which technically were not required by the construction contract.
 
Because the company declined to comment, its motives for withholding test data remain private. Substantial repairs on a giant pile can cost up to $1 million.
 
Thomas W. Joo, a University of California, Davis law professor and contract authority, said that even if Kiewit and its partners had no contractual duty to report the sonic data, they could face legal liability for "straight-up bad faith."
 
"If it's a matter of public safety, the calculus is different," he said. "The whole thing is colored by what's at stake."
 
By providing findings for six piles, the builders could have "engendered a duty to disclose" more fully, Joo said. "Partial, misleading disclosure is a species of fraud."
 
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

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Proposals & EIS due Friday, July 27, 2012. Decision due by the end of summer & the NTP potentially by years end.

http://westfaironline.com/24406/bridge-designer-weighs-in-on-tappan-zee/
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P3s, Maintenance In the Future for NYC Area, Transpo Leaders Say
 
07/26/2012
 Aileen Cho
Text size: A A

 [ Page 1 of 2 ]



----- Advertising -----
 

Alternative project delivery methods, including public-private partnerships (P3s), may well play an increasing role in New York City-area megaprojects. Officials are exploring the possibility of private sector involvement in a range of upcoming ventures including the $3.6-billion LaGuardia Airport central terminal revamp, the extensions of the Hudson-Bergen and Camden light rail lines in New Jersey, and the $1-billion Goethals Bridge rehabilitation.

“We are exploring the possibility of P3s to complement our capital program, and we welcome your ideas,” said James Weinstein, executive director of New Jersey Transit. He spoke at a July 25 forum hosted by Professional Women In Construction and put together by aviation consultant William Fife.

Noting that four prequalified teams are preparing to submit design-build proposals for the $5-billion Tappan Zee Bridge July 27, Joan McDonald, New York State Dept. of Transportation Commissioner, told the audience that “we know there is some design-build fatigue” but said that the planned $500 million rehabilitation of the Kosciuszko Bridge will be design-build, with Requests for Qualifications to go out when the design is at 40%.

Patrick Foye, executive director of the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, said that a Request For Information solicitation has received 15 responses from teams interested in the LaGuardia airport terminal project, which will seek $2.4 billion in private funding. The authority will do the same when it embarks on a revamp of Terminal A at Newark airport as well, he added.

As did all the panelists, he reassured the largely MBE/WBE audience that no matter what the project format, “our commitment to MWBE participation is 18-20% annually, and that stays the same.” He noted that work at the World Trade Center site alone generated $1 billion in five years for minority- and women-owned firms.

The Goethals Bridge project has $500 million from the Transportation Infrastructure in Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) and has prequalified three teams to pursue a 35-year concession to finance, build and maintain the bridge.

But megaprojects aside, all agencies emphasized that their focus was on maintaining a state of good repair for existing facilities. The port authority’s $25-billion 10-year capital plan reflects its return to its “core mission” of transportation facilities, rather than on “real estate” at Ground Zero, Foye said.

Weinstein noted that New Jersey Transit’s $1.2-billion capital program includes “procuring a number of 2- to 3-year on-call contracts” and helping Amtrak maintaining a 100-year-old Northeast Corridor. “New Jersey Transit is the heaviest user of the Northeast Corridor,” he pointed out. “Eighty percent of our quarter-million daily trips touch the Northeast Corridor.”

Thanks to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s (D) NY Works Initiative, the NYSDOT’s $1.6-billion core capital program is now supplemented by $1.2 billion through FY 2014 to advance signature transportation projects, accelerate projects to preserve more than 2,000 lane-miles of roads and accelerate rehabilitation of 100 bridge decks, said McDonald. So far 24 of 42 planned related contracts have been awarded, she added.

“The truth is that megaprojects should not be the focus,” said Hilary Ring, senior director of capital programs for the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Two of the MTA’s four ongoing megaprojects are nearing completion—the $1-billion Fulton Street Transit Center and the  $2-billion No. 7 line subway extension. Major tunneling has also been completed on the Second Avenue Subway and East Side Access projects.  The megaprojects account for only one-quarter of the work to come, said Ring. “We have 20 contracts coming up worth about $50 million or so, and lots of smaller ones too,” he said.
 

Keywords:
New Jersey Transit;
 New York State Dept. of Transportation;
 New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority;
 Port Authority of New York & New Jersey;
 Professional Women in Construction
 
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

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The 4 p.m. deadline has passed, and three teams of contractors have submitted bids to build a replacement for the aging Tappan Zee Bridge, the state Thruway Authority just announced.

Four coalitions of contractors and engineers had been invited to bid on the estimated $5.2 billion construction project in the lower Hudson Valley. Three of those teams did, while a fourth did not submit a bid by the deadline.

The Thruway Authority received more than 70 boxes and about 750,000 pages from the three coalitions, according to a statement from Brian Conybeare, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s special advisor for the Tappan Zee project. (The picture at left shows the paperwork all boxed up.)

The coalition that did not provide a bid called itself the Hudson River Bridge Constructors. It included companies such as Dragados USA, Inc., Flatiron Constructors, Inc., Samsung C&T, E&C Americas, Inc., and Yonkers Contracting Company, Inc.

Here’s the full statement from Conybeare:



 Today the Thruway Authority received three proposals for building a new bridge to replace the Tappan Zee. The proposals comprise more than 70 boxes and an estimated 750,000 pages. The submitted bids are from the following teams:

Kiewit-Skanska-Weeks Joint Venture

(Kiewit Infrastructure Co., Skanska USA Civil Northeast Inc., and Weeks Marine, Inc.)

Tappan Zee Bridge Partners, a Bechtel/Tutor Perini Joint Venture

(Bechtel Infrastructure Corporation and Tutor Perini Corporation)

Tappan Zee Constructors

(Fluor Enterprises, Inc., American Bridge Company, Granite Construction Northeast, Inc., and Traylor Bros., Inc.)

The first stage involves reviewing the proposals for completeness and compliance before the proposals are deemed accepted for substantive selection review, a process expected to take four weeks given the massive volume of material. Additional information regarding the selection process that will begin in four weeks will be available next week, and the process will be open and transparent as federal procurement law will allow.”

http://statepolitics.lohudblogs.com/2012/07/27/only-3-submit-bids-for-tappan-zee-bridge-project/
_______________________________________
Labor stability & achieving major project milestones and timely completion require the Throughway Authority to consider the full history of the three enterprises submitting bids by the deadline.

Of the three enterprises above, Fluor has a disturbing history with wage & hour violations, overall project safety, attention to detail and an abhorrent record before the NLRB and Appellate Courts. Moreover, they are a notorious Union buster and do so shamelessly.

Out of the gate, this leaves Kiewit-Skanska-Weeks Joint Venture & Tappan Zee Bridge Partners, a Bechtel/Tutor Perini Joint Venture as the two leading contenders.

While form, function and the cost and ease of long term maintenance are primary factors, bonding capacity and access to capital in this debt ridden Obama economy must also be of primary import to those charged with awarding this contract, thus leaving one obvious choice, Tappan Zee Bridge Partners.
______________________________________
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Cost of Tappan Zee Bridge Bidder's Cold Feet: $2.5 Million
 
08/08/2012
 By Jeff Rubenstone with Aileen Cho
Text size: A A


enrconstruction.com

 [ Page 1 of 2 ]


Related Links:
Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

Procuring N.Y.'s $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Will Be 'Really Tight'


One of the four teams contending for the estimated $5-billion Tappan Zee Bridge replacement project in New York state chose not to submit a bid at the last moment, forfeiting a $2.5-million stipend paid for bid submissions.

Three of the four teams short-listed for the project officially submitted their bids to the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA) on July 27. The fourth team, Hudson River Bridge Constructors, cancelled its bid unexpectedly, triggering some confusion among team members.

Hudson River Bridge Constructors is a joint venture of Dragados USA Inc., Flatiron Construction, Samsung E&C and Yonkers Contracting Co., with HNTB acting as design partner. Teams were required to present their bids to the state of New York by July 27, and the decision to not submit HRBC's bid came as the materials were about to be delivered.

"Pretty much everyone was shocked," said Theodore Zoli, national bridge chief engineer with HNTB and head of the firm's 35-person project design team.

Recounting what team members who were present told him, Zoli said, "The reps had unloaded the 17 boxes and were just waiting for the call to release them to [NYSTA]. But then the call is, 'Pull it.' "

The decision to pull the bid appears to have come from Flatiron Construction.

According to a statement from Linda Ames, senior communications manager with Samsung C&T, E&C Americas, "The complete proposal was delivered to Albany, N.Y., accompanied by staff from Dragados, Samsung and Yonkers. They were at the Thruway Authority's office ready to submit, awaiting the proper release from our fourth HRBC partner, Flatiron. Unfortunately, Flatiron did not provide its approval to submit the proposal or release its bid bond. As a result, HRBC was regrettably unable to submit the binding proposal."

Representatives of Flatiron Construction declined to comment on the decision. Flatiron Construction is a unit of Hochtief, which, along with Dragados USA, is owned by Madrid-based ACS.

The exact cost of HRBC's bid preparation is unknown, but the NYSTA did set the stipend based on internal estimates. "Our in-house experts put it at about $5-million to $10-million to prepare a bid," said Brian Conybeare, spokesman for the Tappan Zee Bridge Project. "The $2.5-million is to help defray the cost."

   [ page 2 of 2]

The three teams that did submit bids for the bridge project are Kiewit-Skanska-Weeks Joint Venture (Kiewit Infrastructure Co., Skanska USA Civil Northeast Inc. and Weeks Marine Inc.), Tappan Zee Bridge Partners, a Bechtel/Tutor Perini Joint Venture (Bechtel Infrastructure Corp. and Tutor Perini Corp.) and Tappan Zee Constructors (Fluor Enterprises Inc., American Bridge Co., Granite Construction Northeast Inc. and Traylor Bros. Inc.).

The state is now reviewing their materials, and a record of decision is set for Sept. 4, 2012.

The final environmental impact statement for the project was released on Aug. 1.While the bridge's final design will not preclude mass transit, there is no mass-transit component in the current project.

Representatives of the New York State Thruway Authority have said construction of the new bridge is expected to begin by the end of 2012.
 

Keywords:
Tappan Zee;
 Bridge;
 Flatiron;
 Dragados;
 HNTB;
 Yonkers;
 New York State Thruway Authority
 
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Gov. Cuomo releases Final Envoronmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Tappan Zee Bridge Replacement/

http://www.governor.ny.gov/press/08012012-tappan-zee-replacement

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Andrew M. Cuomo - Governor


Governor Cuomo Signs Letter to U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood Requesting Federal Funding to Build a New Bridge Replacing the Tappan Zee


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 (August 20, 2012)

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, joined by Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos, Assemblywoman Ellen Jaffee, Rockland County Executive C. Scott Vanderhoef, Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell and Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, today signed a new letter of intent to U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood to apply for federal funding to build a new bridge to replace the Tappan Zee.

The letter formally initiates New York's application for funding under the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) program and came after the members of the New York Metropolitan Transit Council (NYMTC) unanimously voted to support Governor Cuomo’s plan to build a new bridge.

To view the Governor’s letter go to

 http://www.governor.ny.gov/assets/documents/TappanZeeBridgeLetter.pdf.

 “Today we are one step closer to building a new, safer bridge that will revitalize the Hudson Valley by creating thousands of jobs,” said Governor Cuomo. “After over a decade of delay caused by political dysfunction, this letter demonstrates that we are making real progress towards constructing a stronger, transit-ready bridge that will reduce congestion and be safer for drivers for years to come. Over the past few months, members of my administration have met with residents and business owners throughout the Hudson Valley to ensure that this process is as transparent and inclusive as possible. I applaud Majority Leader Skelos, Speaker Silver, and the Hudson Valley County Executives for their leadership and dedication to New Yorkers.”

Senate Majority Leader Dean G. Skelos said, "A new Tappan Zee Bridge means thousands of new jobs for the Hudson Valley, less congestion and a better quality of life for the people who travel this span every day. I applaud Governor Cuomo for his leadership on this important project, and for his vision of what is possible here in New York. Senate Republicans will continue to work with him to turn this state around, as we did on the design-build legislation which contributed to moving this project forward."
 
Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver said, "I applaud Governor Cuomo for taking critical steps to advance one of the most complex public transportation projects New York State has undertaken in many years. I am looking forward to further details as the project progresses that will consider the concerns of residents, commuters, local businesses, and government officials to safeguard travelers, eliminate traffic congestion, and provide future mass transit options. This is a significant investment in the region's economy that will result in the creation of tens of thousands of jobs for hard working men and women, and I commend the Governor for his leadership."

 
This letter represents a significant step in the process to build a new, stronger, safer bridge that will last 100 years. Last fall, President Obama granted Governor Cuomo’s request to expedite the process of constructing a new bridge to replace the Tappan Zee and to make the project a priority. Governor Cuomo also partnered with the legislative leaders to pass a design-build law that will be used to streamline and prevent cost overruns of building a new bridge. The Governor presented a plan for a new bridge that will be safer for drivers, create better options and faster service for bus commuters, be transit-ready for rail or bus rapid transit, and create 45,000 new jobs in the Hudson Valley. Just last month, Governor Cuomo released the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) on the new bridge project. The FEIS was compiled by a dozen state and federal agencies responding to over 3,000 comments from the public.

 
The NYMTC vote signifies an agreement between local officials from New York City, Long Island and the Lower Hudson Valley to seek federal approval for the Tappan Zee bridge replacement project. The New York Metropolitan Transportation Council (NYMTC) is a federally-required regional council of governments that provides a collaborative transportation planning forum for New York City, Long Island and the lower Hudson Valley. NYMTC, pursuant to federal law, serves as the region’s Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO). A core requirement for receiving and spending federal transportation funds is that states follow the prescribed federally-required metropolitan and statewide planning processes.

Assemblywoman Ellen Jaffee said, “I am very encouraged by the willingness of the Governor's office to listen to the concerns of the community about this important project that will improve public safety and present opportunities for economic development in our region.”

Rockland County Executive C. Scott Vanderhoef said, “I am pleased that we are moving ahead with a new safer bridge that will be built for tomorrow and will be able to accommodate mass transit. I applaud Governor Cuomo's commitment to this project and to working with the Hudson Valley community in order to make this process go forward.”

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell said, “This project is more than likely one of the largest projects that New Yorkers will be undertaking as far as transportation infrastructure projects. American history tells us that it is these types of projects that helped our nation climb out the Great Depression. The common goal I share today with my colleagues is to get our families back to work or keep them working. As Putnam County Executive I would like to applaud Governor Cuomo for his genuine demonstration of good faith and leadership in working with County Executives Astorino and Vanderhoef and myself in making sure that this project move forward with as much information as possible, and I look to The New York State Legislature to make sure the fiscal oversight is place in order to keep this project on track.”

Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino said, “Today marks an important step in building a new Tappan Zee Bridge. Challenges await us, but we are moving forward - unified in our commitment to give our counties, state and country a bridge that creates jobs, strengthens our economy, protects the environment and leaves a legacy we can be proud of.”

New Yorkers can see toll options, submit questions and concerns about the project through www.NewNYBridge.com or call the toll free number, 855-TZBRIDGE. The website also features videos of the community meetings and a database of all documents created over the last 10 years on the Tappan Zee Bridge. A Twitter account has been set up for Tappan Zee project, and New Yorkers can receive updates by following @NewNYBridge.
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Governor Cuomo Announces Team of Artists, Technical Experts, and Community Leaders to Help Select Final Bridge Design for Tappan Zee Project

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 Albany, NY (September 19, 2012)


 Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced a selection review team for the new bridge to replace the Tappan Zee. The review team will include internationally renowned artists and architects, under the auspices of the New York State Council of the Arts, who will review proposed bridge designs as well as assist local community leaders and transportation experts in the evaluation process.
 
The artists and experts who will review the designs include: (see link for full listing/qualifications)

 
 • Jeffrey Koons, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
• Richard Meier, a Pritzker Prize winning architect and Gold Medal awardee for architecture from the Academy of Arts and Letters
 • Thomas P. Campbell, Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art
• Keith Brownlie, an internationally acclaimed bridge designer
 
"Another day, another big step toward building a new bridge to replace the Tappan Zee which will be stronger, safer, better as well as one which will live up to the beauty and splendor of the Hudson River," Governor Cuomo said. "For this project, we are creating a different kind of review team – it’s a team that combines technical experts, architectural experts, local experts as well as artists to ensure the new bridge is the best choice and fit for the region."
 
The selection process will evaluate the technical quality of the proposals in conjunction with pricing information, to identify the proposal that offers the best value to New York State. The "best value" approach, made possible by the design-build legislation enacted by Governor Cuomo last year, looks at factors such as design and long-term quality of the project to ensure that the proposal chosen meets the needs of the region, the transportation system and toll payers.
 
Specifically, the selection review team will be evaluating the best value of each bid based on criteria stated in the RFP, which generally include: 
 
 • Best price for toll payers
• Bridge structure and design
• Investment in future transit options, including BRT and rail
• Traffic management plan
• Plan for working collaboratively with community and local stakeholders
• Ability to meet strict environmental requirements
• Construction plan
• Bridge lifespan
• Geotechnical for bridge foundations
• History and experience of design-build team
 
The review team members will undergo rigorous procurement training before beginning the bid evaluation process as required by federal procurement law. Once the evaluation process is complete, the review team has a number of options before it sends a final recommendation to the Governor. The team can:
 
 
 • Recommend one of the three bids submitted in July
• Authorize negotiations with one or more bidders based on its submission
• Authorize a request for a best and final offer from multiple bidders.
 
 
When the review team has made its recommendation, a final formal decision will be made by the Thruway Authority, subject to the approval of its Board.

http://www.governor.ny.gov/press/09192012Tappan-Zee-Project


 
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OSHA Proposes Fines Over St. Louis Bridge Death

{enrconstruction.com}

10/05/2012
 St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Text size: AA



By Ken Leiser, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Oct. 05--ST. LOUIS -- Builders of the new Mississippi River bridge in north St. Louis were accused of four safety violations in connection with a bridge worker who fell to his death in March.
 
The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommended the Massman Construction, Traylor Bros., and Alberici joint venture be fined $15,300 for four safety violations deemed serious.

Massman Traylor Alberici officials could not be reached late Thursday. But an OSHA spokeswoman said the joint venture has scheduled an informal conference on Oct. 16.
 
Andy Gammon, 35, of Park Hills, was a carpenter working for the joint venture team, on a piece of equipment called an aerial man lift when it fell into the river.
 
In the citation issued last week, OSHA officials said the man lift was "placed on a barge and used by employees without following all manufacturers' requirements for safe use." The Genie N80 boom lift operations manual cautions against using the machine "on a moving or mobile surface or vehicle."

 
The other alleged violations include: 

-- Lack of safe practices and procedures for installation of pipe pilings.

-- Failure to adequately protect employees installing pipe pilings from work hazards.
 
-- Failure to train employees on the safe operation of the Genie N80 boom lift.

The accident temporarily brought work on the bridge to a halt and set off a massive search in the river just off the Illinois banks of the Mississippi.
 
The $640 million Mississippi River bridge project includes not only the main span but realignment and reconstruction of Interstate 70 and several local roads on the Missouri and Illinois sides of the river.
 
With a main span of 1,500 feet, the 400-foot-tall bridge will be the third-longest cable-stayed bridge in the United States.
 
___

(c)2012 the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Visit the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at www.stltoday.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

A service of YellowBrix, Inc.

By utilizing the content on this page, you agree to the legal terms.
______________________________

So, to be clear, according to the Federal government (OSHA) a carpenter or other tradesmans life is worth $15,300 in Fines on a $640 Million dollar project when the GC, CM & Project Developer fail to properly train workers in specific task orientated safety measures. Don't become a victim through silence. When you see something amiss, speak up & report it. Also, given the tech age we live & work in make sure you document the specific safety violation and request a fromal written response from those in charge. Hold them accountable for their actions and inaction because the life you save may be your own.
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

Ted
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Fluor Team Is Apparent Choice for $5.2B NY Bridge
 
10/26/2012
 By Debra K. Rubin and Aileen Cho
Text size: A A


AP/John Minchillo
 
A replacement for the Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River has long been a priority of transportation planners in New York State.
 
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New York State officials have apparently selected a Fluor Corp.-led team to continue negotiations for the contract to design and build the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge across the Hudson River, an estimated $5.2 billion-contract, according to several industry sources close to the competition and a published report.

A spokesman for Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said that state officials contacted one of the teams to make changes in its bid, but he would not confirm that the bidder contacted was Fluor-led Tappan Zee Constructors or that it is the state's choice for the project. "No one's in the lead," he said.

Tappan Zee Constructors also includes contractors Granite Construction Northeast, American Bridge Co. and Traylor Bros. Inc. The team also includes engineering firms HDR, Buckland & Taylor and URS.

Company officials would not comment, but industry sources with knowledge of competition details say the Fluor-led team received a letter about 10 days ago inviting it to continue discussions with the state. According to one executive who asked not to be named because he is not authorized to speak on the procurement, "formal negotiations" would start as early as next week "to complete contract details."

An executive with ties to New York transportation procurement said: "If I were a betting person I would say the [published report] is correct. They have not cut the other proposers loose yet, but that won't happen until the deal is made with the winner. I was with some people from two of the [Tappan Zee Constructors team] firms yesterday and they didn't deny it."

The other competing teams were believed to have received letters indicating they would not continue with negotiations, the industry sources said. But the state could still "move forward with another team," said a state official.

The industry executive said the state's unclear public stance on the team selection was due to sensitivities related to its dealing with environmental and public advocacy groups "that wanted a larger voice in the outcome."

The edge gained by the Fluor-led team was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

Procurement Process Goes On

State transportation officials say that the procurement process is continuing.

"We are assembling all the final facts and costs" [and] no selection or recommendation for award has been made, says Dan Weiller, public affairs director for the state Thruway Authority. "All three bids will be submitted for public review before any selection committee recommendation is made to the Thruway authority board, which makes the final award."

Also competing for the contract is a joint venture of Kiewit Infrastructure Co., Skanska USA Civil Northeast Inc., Weeks Marine Inc., subcontractor ECCO III Enterprises Inc., Parsons Brinckerhoff and Parsons Transportation Group; and Tappan Zee Bridge Partners, a JV of Bechtel Infrastructure Corp. and Tutor Perini Corp. with Michael Baker, STV and Gannett Fleming.

The sources did not disclose proposal costs but indicated they were "within the budget." One said that teams could be evalulated on project life cycle costs. He added the Fluor and Kiewit teams were set to use steel as the primary bridge material, but Bechtel/Tutor Perini has chosen concrete.

One source with knowledge of the procurement said the proposal totals "were about $4 billion."

The state spokesman would not specify when a decision will be made, noting it would be within "the next two months." But the industry source said the choice could be sooner. The project is a key priority of Gov. Cuomo.

"They want to wrap negotiations before Election Day," he said.

The industry source added that the state also plans to seek proposals for a consultant to serve as owner's rep on the project, and contenders could include firms on teams not selected.

The three short-listed teams officially submitted their bids to the agency on July 27. A fourth team, Hudson River Bridge Constructors, cancelled its bid unexpectedly. It had been a joint venture of Dragados USA Inc., Flatiron Construction, Samsung E&C and Yonkers Contracting Co., with HNTB acting as design partner.

A fifth team, led by the Impregilo-Halmar joint venture and including Hardesty & Hanover LLP, Louis Berger Group and Hatch Mott McDonald, was not shortlisted.



 


Keywords:
Tappan Zee;
 Bridge;
 Fluor;
 Tappan Zee Constructors;
 New York;
 Gov. Andrew Cuomo
 
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

Ted
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{recordonline.com}
By Judy Rife

Times Herald-Record

 Published: 2:00 AM - 10/07/12

Almost 365 days after Gov. Andrew Cuomo first announced he would fast-track the replacement of the Tappan Zee Bridge, the state is poised to select a contractor and start construction.

The Federal Highway Administration formally concluded the required environmental review on Sept. 25 and gave the state the green light to proceed with the estimated $5.2 billion project.

Already, an 11-person selection committee and 33 advisers, appointed on Sept. 19, have begun sifting through the 750 boxes that contain the three bids in Tarrytown.


What a difference a year makes

October 2011: Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the New York State Thruway Authority will fast track replacement of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Public scoping sessions are held for a new environmental review.


November: Prospective bidders are interviewed and a new financial adviser is hired.


December: State lawmakers approve design-build legislation.


January 2012: The draft environmental impact statement is released.


February: Qualified bidders are identified and a letter of interest in a TIFIA loan is filed with the federal government.


February-March: Public hearings are held on the draft environmental impact statement.


March: A request for proposals is released to the four prequalified bidders.


July: Bids are received from three of the four bidders and reviewed for completeness and conformity.


August: The final environmental impact statement is released; the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council includes the project in the regional plan and a new letter of interest in a TIFIA loan is filed.


September: The Federal Highway Administration signs off on the environmental review and issues a record of decision. A selection committee and advisers are appointed and the vetted bids are transferred to them for a recommendation.
 
"After years of planning and re-planning, studying and re-studying, process upon process, meeting upon meeting, the project has been jump-started," said Jeff Zupan, senior fellow for transportation at the Regional Plan Association and a Rockland County resident. "Now it's moving ahead, and that's good."


The people still await answers

But Zupan and others who have followed process upon process since 1997, when then-Gov. George Pataki appointed a task force to address congestion in the Tappan Zee corridor, point out that the public is still waiting for answers to some basic questions:

How will the bridge be paid for, what will it look like, and when will transit return to the picture?

"I credit the governor's personal involvement for the remarkable speed at which the process has moved over the past year," said Scott Vanderhoef, the Rockland County Executive. "But there are still issues going forward, and they are principally driven by finances."


How will it be paid for?

The New York State Thruway Authority, in the final environmental impact statement filed on Aug. 1, described the financial plan in one sentence: "Funding for the project is reasonably available through toll revenue bonds and other potential sources."

"Other potential sources" have been reduced to one, a low-interest, long-term "TIFIA" loan from the U.S. Department of Transportation. The state, which wasn't successful in snaring one of the loans in February, is taking advantage of new TIFIA rules to ask for the new maximum — 49 percent of a project's cost — the second time around.

The authority is relatively confident — given the Obama administration's support for the TZB project and the consistent investment grade rating of its debt — of getting something, but until it knows how much, it can't predict what will happen to tolls on the bridge or the Thruway itself.

Cuomo, after suggesting tolls on the bridge would rise to $14 from $5, has backed away from specifics and tossed the sticky wicket to an advisory group.

At the same time, the Thruway Authority's plan to boost truck tolls 45 percent to pay for everything else for the next several years has stalled in the wake of widespread opposition.

"It's been a dispiriting 12 months for anybody whose job it is to figure out how to pay for the new bridge, when you look at the macro indicators of economic activity and transportation patterns and automobile use," said Charles Komanoff, a transportation policy analyst in New York City. "Traffic levels simply are not rebounding."

The authority, however, is prepared to use bond anticipation notes to fund the first phase of construction, to keep the project on the fast track and allow TIFIA awards and toll policies to evolve over time.


What will it look like?

The aesthetics of the new bridge have become another leap of faith for a public that has long anticipated having a hands-on role in fashioning its design.

Cuomo, however, realized the Thruway Authority couldn't fast-track TZB construction if it had to rely on the conventional design-bid-build approach, and pressed legislators in December for permission to trial design-build projects for three years.

As a result, the three consortiums vying for the bridge contract aren't just vying to build it; they're vying to design it, too.

"The new process, in some respects, shuts out the public until a design is selected. But we're hopeful we will get a bridge that serves as a majestic symbol of the river and the valley, that enhances rather than detracts from their scenic quality," said Hayley Carlock, an environmental advocacy attorney at Scenic Hudson.

Waddell Stillman, president of Historic Hudson Valley, agreed: "The new bridge should display the elegance of great engineering "» (with a design) that respects and befits the natural beauty and historic significance of the river it crosses."

The inclusion of representatives of Rockland and Westchester counties on the selection committee; and luminaries in art, architecture and engineering among the advisers is a sign that the state wants to get the design right — "right" being a subjective concept at best.

The design-build process, at any rate, doesn't wed the selection committee to the lowest bidder, but rather to the best value — and best value allows it to ask a bidder to tweak a design.


Transit's a big question

Gov. Cuomo, despite his insistence that the state can't afford both a new bridge and new transit services, agreed in August to appoint a transit task force to recommend short- and long-term options for bringing bus rapid transit or commuter rail to the corridor.

The task force was a quid pro quo to secure the votes of Vanderhoef and his Westchester and Putnam counterparts to amend the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council's regional plan to include the TZB project.

Without the unanimous vote, the Thruway Authority couldn't jump the remaining federal hurdles to reach the finish line.

Vanderhoef is optimistic that the as-yet-unappointed task force will be more than window-dressing, as construction of the new bridge proceeds and the financial picture becomes clearer.

"I still want to see some kind of a beginning to a BRT (bus rapid transit) system by the time the bridge opens," said Vanderhoef.

To Veronica Vanterpool, executive director of the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, the task force is an unknown quantity in terms of its ultimate ability to effect change.

"But it is the best opportunity we have to return to the conversation that Pataki started about reducing congestion in the corridor," said Vanterpool. "Replacing the bridge became part of that conversation, and now it's the only conversation."

judyrife@gmail.com
Ted
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

Ted
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REVEALED FOR NEW HUDSON RIVER (TAPPAN ZEE) BRIDGE

{enrconstruction.com}

State officials in New York displayed for the first time the proposed designs for a new Tappan Zee Bridge across the Hudson River.

The new span will replace an existing bridge about 15 miles north of New York City that joins Westchester and Rockland counties. Without identifying any concept as the probable winner, the officials said the preferred design has the lowest estimated construction cost, shortest estimated construction time and least amount of anticipated dredging.

A team led by Fluor has been identified by industry sources and media reports as the preferred bidder.

All three of the designs unveiled Dec. 5 by the New York State Thruway Authority and Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) involve cable-stayed bridges.

Proposal 1 features two pairs of tapering H-shaped pylons supporting the main span, at an estimated cost of $3.142 billion. It would take five years and about three months to build and require 951,000 cu yd of dredging, according to the presentation.

Proposal 2 features two single pylons, with an estimated cost of $3.99 billion, almost six years of construction and 1.8 million cu yd of dredging. Proposal 3, which would cost $4.059 billion and also take about six years to build, features two pairs of H-shaped pylons and would require 1.55 million cu yd of dredging.

To one experienced bridge designer, the Tappan Zee Bridge concepts all are worthy.

“As cable-stayed construction has become more commonplace for bridges in the span range of the Tappan Zee, it has become more and more difficult for engineers to distinguish their designs,” says John Hillman, senior associate with Teng & Associates, Inc.

A selection committee of artists, architects and engineers has endorsed Proposal 1.

“Each of the proposals submitted for the Tappan Zee demonstrate a tasteful adaptation to try and make a distinction from an aesthetic viewpoint," says Hillman. "But I am not surprised that public sentiment leans towards proposal one. It’s true that beauty is in holding to the simplicity of the cable-stayed form and it’s also not surprising that this simplicity would also lead to the least cost.”

A final decision by state officials on the winning team and proposal is expected by later this month.


http://enr.construction.com/infrastructure/transportation/2012/1207-conceptual-designs-revealed-for-tappan-zee-bridge.asp

 

Keywords:
Tappan Zee Bridge;
 Thruway Authority;
 Fluor
 

Ted
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

Ted
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Fluor-Led Venture Wins $3.14B Bid for New Tappan Zee Bridge

{enrconstruction.com}
 
12/17/2012

It's official: The New York State Thruway Authority has chosen a $3.14-billion bid by Tappan Zee Constructors as the plan for the next version of the 3.1-mile-long, 57-year-old Tappan Zee bridge — the lowest bid submitted from all of the competing teams.

In a statement announcing the winning team and bid Monday, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said, "After more than a decade of gridlock and millions of taxpayer dollars spent, we have ended the dysfunction of the past and have a new bridge proposal ready to break ground next year." He said the Thruway Board selected the Tappan Zee Constructors plan, "which offers New York toll payers the biggest bang for their buck – with the best price, shortest construction time, minimal dredging, and can accommodate mass transit in the future. This is a major milestone for a bridge project that was a metaphor for the dysfunction of government and is now a national model for progress.”

The winning design will feature two pairs of tapering H-shaped pylons supporting the main span, at an estimated cost of $3.142 billion. It would take five years and about three months to build and require 951,000 cu yd of dredging, according to the presentation.

Tappan Zee Constructors is a consortium that includes contractors Fluor Enterprises, Granite Construction Northeast, American Bridge Co. and Traylor Bros. Inc. The team also includes engineering firms HDR, Buckland & Taylor and URS.

It's a big win for the venture and for Fluor Corp., which called the mega-project the single largest bridge project in New York’s history, and the state’s first application of its recently enacted design-build legislation, expected to produce "substantial savings relative to the $5.2 billion estimated cost."

Based on its 30 percent ownership of the joint venture, Fluor said  it plans to book its portion of the project into backlog once the contract receives final approval and a notice to proceed is issued.

"The Fluor team developed a unique and innovative design that reduced the weight of the structure and minimized the number and size of foundations required," the firm said in a statement.

"The design solution also utilizes a shallow superstructure and a 350’ long-span design to minimize the number of piers and provide a sleeker looking bridge that enhances the view corridors within the lower Hudson Valley. The main span is a composite deck cable-stayed structural system with outwardly inclined main span towers that create an iconic look and accommodate future transit loads."

The winning proposal was way below the two other bids, one of which came in at $3.99 billion and called for dredging 1.8 million cu yards of the Hudson River, and another that came in at $4.05 billion and called for dredging 1.55 million cu yards of the Hudson River.

Fluor said the design will allow for dredge quantities to be reduced from 1.8 million cubic yards to less than one million cubic yards, lessening environmental impacts, costs, and schedule durations. The company said the plan also calls for the use of unique heavy lifting equipment that Fluor and its partner American Bridge own and had custom built for the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge project. Construction of the new Tappan Zee bridge is expected to take five years.

For one experienced bridge designer, the design is worthy.

“As cable-stayed construction has become more commonplace for bridges in the span range of the Tappan Zee, it has become more and more difficult for engineers to distinguish their designs,” says John Hillman, senior associate with Teng & Associates, Inc.

A selection committee of artists, architects and engineers had also endorsed the winning proposal.

New York public officials cheered the news.

In a statement, U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) said, “We are glad the Thruway Authority Executive Board chose the option which is least expensive to the public, and has a lesser environmental impact on our region. A new bridge is not only necessary for transportation, but will be a boom for economic development in the entire Hudson Valley region.”

Added Rob Astorino, Westchester county executive:  “The selection of the proposal by Tappan Zee Constructors delivers on three critical fronts: cost, completion time, and mass transit readiness to carry express buses on day one. And after so many years of gridlock, building a safer and less congested bridge as soon as possible is the most attractive option for Westchester. I thank the Governor and his team for their thorough review and for the appointment of the mass transit task force that will identify short, medium and long term transit solutions for the new bridge and the I-287 corridor.”

 

This article was updated on Dec. 18 to update comments from Fluor Corp.
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

tester
 ..."The Fluor team developed a unique design that reduced the weight of the structure and minimized the

number and size of foundations required. The design solution also utilizes a shallow superstructure and a

350-ft.-long span design to minimize the number of piers and provide a sleeker looking bridge that enhances
 
the view corridors within the lower Hudson Valley. The main span is a composite deck cable-stayed

structural system with outwardly inclined main span towers that create an iconic look and accommodate

future transit loads"...


http://www.forconstructionpros.com/news/10843852/fluor-team-wins-31-billion-contract-for-tappan-zee-bridge-replacement
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

Ted
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Tappan Zee Bridge Advances, With HNTB Named Owner's Engineer
 


12/26/2012
 By Jeff Rubenstone
{enrconstruction.com}


The New York State Thruway Authority has named HNTB as owner's engineer for the Tappan Zee Bridge replacement project. Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) on Dec. 17 announced the winning design, a $3.142-billion bid from Fluor-led consortium Tappan Zee Constructors in what is touted as the largest-ever design-build project in the state.

In addition to Fluor Corp., Tappan Zee Constructors comprises American Bridge Co., Granite Construction Northeast and Traylor Bros., with HDR acting as lead designer. The bid beat out two other short-listed teams, offering a lower price and significantly less dredging than the other proposals.

It is not uncommon for the owner's engineer to come from a firm on another short-listed team, but HNTB was in an unusual position.

The firm had been part of a fourth short-listed team that, at the eleventh hour, chose not to submit its project bid. Rochester, N.Y.-based Bergmann Associates has been subcontracted by HNTB for environmental monitoring and 3D modeling oversight.

The new Tappan Zee Bridge project is the largest design-build effort in New York state since the 2011 passage of a design-build law; the job has a 62.5-month project schedule.

"The design-build process produced a savings of at least $1.5 billion compared to the amounts estimated by the Federal Highway Administration and our own original estimates," said Thruway Authority Chairman Howard P. Milstein in a statement.

While the Thruway Authority expects work to begin in early 2013, the approval process is not yet complete. The plan will be reviewed by the state attorney general, and the state comptroller has approval authority over all authority contracts over $50,000. The comptroller's office has 90 days to review the contract.

The three submitted designs all call for cable-stayed dual spans with a 100-year design life, but the winning proposal favors steel over concrete far more than the other two.

In a statement, Fluor said its choice "reduced the weight of the structure and minimized the number and size of foundations required." It has a "shallow superstructure and a 350-ft-long span design to minimize the number of piers and provide a sleeker-looking bridge." A "Buy America" provision requires all steel to come from the U.S.

While the design for the three-mile-long bridge does not include a mass-transit component, the Thruway Authority stated that the bridge will have the "strength and capacity provisions to accommodate various mass-transit modes."

One of the project's major challenges is the composition of Hudson River Basin soils. The bridge, crossing at one of the river's widest points, has geology marked by significant silt buildup and soft-clay substrates.

A source familiar with one of the other short-listed bids but bound by a non-disclosure agreement notes that the soil quality in the river is very poor and will require regular dredging just to get barges to the bridge site. TZC may be able to avoid some dredging by using innovations such as barges with shallower drafts, the source says.

A related issue is the amount of test-pile data needed to build in such poor soils.

"Confirmation of the geotechnical assumptions and foundations capacities in the soft clays below the riverbed will be critical, and an extensive geotechnical testing program is anticipated, commencing in the new year," says Mark Roche of Arup, the project's longtime consulting engineer. "Major challenges and obstacles for the design team include confirmation of the capacity and deflection characteristics of the proposed foundation solutions in the deep varved clays in the causeway area, transitions from soft to hard founding substrates and compliance with performance requirements for the potential future addition of commuter rail." {This is where the cost over-runs will occur and it will determine which of the three designs were most cost effective long term. The lowest price is not always the best option.}

The existing Tappan Zee Bridge is technically a floating bridge, with its main span supported by massive concrete boxes that were sunk to the riverbed during construction and pumped out.

Details of TZC support design have not been released, but Roche is optimistic. "This is really a foundation project—once the [team] is out of the ground, the project should be relatively straightforward."

Winner:

Tappan Zee Constructors, $3.142 Billion; 
Five years, 2.5 months, dredging: 951,000 cu yd
Concrete Weight (substructure) 350,000 tons
Concrete Weight (superstructure) 200,000 tons
Steel Weight (superstructure) 110,000 tons
Number of Piles 964

Tappan Zee Bridge Partners (Bechtel-Tutor Perini), $3.990 Billion;
Five years, 11.5 months, dredging: 1,800,000 cu yd
Concrete Weight (substructure) 420,000 tons
Concrete Weight (superstructure) 410,000 tons
Steel Weight (superstructure) 15,000 tons
Number of Piles 1,387


Kiewit-Skanska-Weeks, $4.059 Billion;
Five years, 11 months, dredging: 1,550,000 cu yd
Concrete Weight (substructure) 310,000 tons
Concrete Weight (superstructure) 175,000 tons (deck) 70,000 tons (beams)
Steel Weight (superstructure) 60,000 tons
Number of Piles 1,392

SOURCE: New York State Thruway Authority

 
 
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

BUY AMERICAN
Once construction starts keep an eye out for the China Bridge & RailRoad Const. Co. banners.
Ted
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Re: Four Teams Short-Listed for $5-Billion Tappan Zee Bridge Rebuild

Ted
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N.Y. Thruway Authority Hires Project Manager for $3.14-Bil. Tappan Zee Bridge Replacement
{enrconstruction.com}
 
03/05/2013
 By Jeff Rubenstone
Text size: A A

The project manager who helped oversee the speedy replacement of the collapsed Interstate 35W bridge in Minneapolis is now set to run one of the largest bridge projects in the nation. The New York State Thruway Authority has hired bridge engineer Peter Sanderson as project manager for the $3.14-billion Tappan Zee Bridge replacement project.

With a reported annual salary of $340,000 per year, Sanderson will lead a team from HNTB, which is acting as owner's engineer, and will oversee design-build contractor Tappan Zee Constructors, a consortium of Fluor Enterprises, American Bridge Co., Granite Construction Northeast, Traylor Bros. and HDR.

“The project director will be responsible for keeping the New New York Bridge on schedule and within budget, and Peter Sanderson is an outstanding choice for this role because he has extensive experience and a proven track record," said Thruway Authority Chairman Howard P. Milstein in a statement issued Feb. 20th.

Sanderson, formerly of Flatiron Construction, served as the project lead on the effort to build a replacement span in Minneapolis following the fatal 2007 collapse of the I-35W bridge in Minneapolis. The new bridge was completed three months ahead of schedule, just thirteen months after the collapse. For his work on the project, ENR named Sanderson a 2008 Newsmaker.

Sanderson's salary has drawn fire from the Civil Services Employees Union, which represents many Thruway Authority employees. CSEA president Danny Donahue said “this is disgraceful in every way, paying one employee that kind of money at the same time he is laying off necessary workers to prove a political point shows contempt for the workers and the public.” According to the CSEA the Thruway Authority recently laid off 234 workers, and is currently engaged in labor negotiations.

The Thruway Authority and TZ Constructors are planning to release an official project budget and schedule to the public in May, according to a press release. Currently there are plans to perform test borings in the Hudson River and establish a staging area by the end of March. The next tentative milestones are test piling installation in June and dredging operations to begin in August.

The first of the bridge's two spans is expected to open in 2016, with a completion date for the entire project set for 2018.
 

Keywords:
Bridge;
 Tappan Zee;
 New N.Y. Bridge;
 New York;
 Peter Sanderson;
 Constructors;
 Thruway Authority;
 Howard P. Milstein;
 HNTB
 
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