Amalgamated Carpenters

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Amalgamated Carpenters

Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
Here is the Boss/Scab "Union" Richard Dourrough & Robert Kweisinski are pushing:

http://www.amalgamatedcarpenters.com/

Contractors

The United Brotherhood of Carpenters has long ago stopped supporting the middle class contractors. Their leadership has hired and promote unqualified and untrained workers, taking jobs away from qualified workers and making union carpenters look bad. Their leadership has been instituting self-serving and hard-headed rules at the expense of the contractors and workers. Contractors have been shut down on a weekly basis when they are late on payment of weekly benefits.

In short, the UBC has increasing restricted how, where and when contractors and their union employees can do their jobs.

In today’s economic climate, the UBC’s actions are especially damaging. That’s why we are offering a new and better alternative – the Amalgamated Carpenters Union.

We are building a better and fairer union from the ground up to serve the working men and women and the small businessmen who employ them.

The Amalgamated Carpenters Union knows that neither contractors nor workers can exist without the other.

Carpenters and contractors must work together to stop losing market share and to provide jobs for our new members.

Wehave therefore developed our rules with the needs of contractors in mind.

For example:

    * Our plan anticipates a reduction of total labor costs by 20-30% while maintaining the same level of health and benefits.
    * Amalgamated Carpenters will approve full mobility for contractors and workers to operate where the work is.
    * We will not shut down contractors on a weekly basis for non-payment of fringe benefits and will revise the payment schedule to monthly, not weekly.
    * We support the inclusion of an industry advancement fund to promote and expand the carpenters’ trade.
    * We will form a labor/management market recovery committee so that we can better respond to the needs of industry and ensure that our contractors can compete with open shop contractors.
    * The Amalgamated Carpenters will adhere to a code of ethics and support transparency, flexibility and fairness.
    * We will refer highly trained carpenters referred on basis of specialization and skill, and maintaining a separate and distinct out of work list. We will place a special focus on promoting & referring skilled and qualified labor.
    * We will replace defined pension plans with 401K’s for new members. Vested union members will keep their pensions.

Workers and contractors need each other.  What we don’t need is the overbearing, rigid and hard headed United Brotherhood of Carpenters leadership.

_______________________________

We are pleased to announce the formation of the Amalgamated Carpenters and Joiners Union, a new union that has the support of the Building and Construction Trades Department.

Currently, we are finalizing discussions on affiliating with an International Union which is a member of the AFL-CIO, Washington, DC.

We offer a viable option to the New York City District Council of Carpenters (“NYCDC”), which has, to date, made it extremely difficult for contractors to compete for work and for members to find jobs.

Having previously polled approximately 1,000 contractors in the New York City area, we are well aware of the needs of the industry to successfully compete with non-union companies.

Unfortunately, with lost market share of approximately 30% to non-union companies in the last five (5) years, we feel the following is required to be part and parcel of a collective bargaining agreement in order to attract and maintain qualified union contractors:

    * Replace pension plan with a 401K, thereby eliminating concerns of an unfunded withdrawal liability;
    * Benefit contribution remitted by companies every month, instead of every week;
    * Offering highly trained carpenters, referred on basis of specialization and skill levels.  For example, Dockbuilders will maintain a separate and distinct out-of-work list, a system that has successfully worked in the past with most projects completed under budget and ahead of schedule;
    * Reduce the total compensation package to a level approximately 20-30% lower than existing rates of the NYCDC, while maintaining the same level of health benefits and wages;
    * Form a labor/management market recovery committee to enable us to better respond to the needs of the industry

If you are interested in negotiating with or learning more about the Amalgamated Carpenters and Joiners Union, feel free to contact our counsel,

Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq. of Bisceglie & DeMarco, Esq.,
365 Rifle Camp Road, Woodland Park, NJ  07424 and 711 Third Avenue, Suite 1803, New York, NY  10017,
Telephone no. (973) 742-8900,
E-mail address:  abisceglie@bd-lawfirm.com.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

procity
the mobility part sends me to the nonunion sector i have no connections nor do i know anybody who owns a union company.keep me informed when this goes thru ill sell my union card
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

Robert Kwiecinski
From what I've heard the amalgamated carpenters have made some changes to their personel and their start up plan. The AFL-CIO would not have given them a charter unless they had their act together.
Angelo I guess your not involved anymore thats why your trying to stir up the pot. The carpenters in NJ will not accept wage and condition givebacks, and i'm sure Rich Dorrough is on the same page.God bless you if you want to give it away under Mccaron and Spencers bargaining with no member input. When the membership takes back it's union , the membership will decide what wages and conditions they will work by through rank and file collective bargaining. It's as simple as that. The membership Rules.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

Carlo Tresca
Angelo R. Bisceglie Jr., lawyer for Amalgamated Carpenters, for three years represented indicted Columbo capo Thomas J. Petrizzo, controller of N.Y.C. District Council of Carpenters President Frederick Devine (1991 to 1996.)  

New York Times, April 11, 1995, see full article below:

...Angelo R. Bisceglie Jr., who was Mr. Petrizzo's labor lawyer for three years.

"As a former prosecutor, you have a sixth sense for someone who might be connected," said Mr. Bisceglie, who was an assistant prosecutor in Essex and Morris Counties and a special counsel to former Gov. Jim Florio. "This man was a gentleman without the slightest hint of anything unsavory about him."
_________________________________________

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colombo_crime_family

Colombo crime family: Controlled unions

    * N.Y.C. District Council of Carpenters The Colombo crime family and the Genovese crime family worked together from 1991 to 1996 extorting the N.Y.C. District Council of Carpenters union. Colombo capos Thomas Petrizzo and Vincent "Jimmy" Angellino controlled Council President Frederick Devine. The two crime families illegally created hundreds of jobs for their associates through the Council.[104] In 1998, government witnesses Sammy Gravano and Vincent Cafaro testified against Devine. He was found guilty of embezzling union funds and sentenced to 15 months in prison.[105]

104. ^Mobsters, Unions, and feds: the mafia and the American labor movement by James B. Jacobs (page 191)

...Salvatore Gravano knew of another connection: "I am aware that Fred Devine is associated with Thomas Petrizzo, a capo in the Colombo Organized Crime Family." Salvatore Gravano Decl. at 4, United States v. Dist. Council, 1994 WL704811 (S.D.N.Y. Dec. 16 1994) (No. 90 Civ. 5722 (CHS)) (Feb. 10, 1993).
________________________________________

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/04/11/nyregion/double-portrait-of-a-man-on-trial-astounds-friends.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

Double Portrait of a Man on Trial Astounds Friends
By SELWYN RAAB
Published: April 11, 1995

Correction Appended

For 15 years, Thomas J. Petrizzo was a vital force in fashioning the skyline of New York. Major contractors and developers lionized him for his acumen in shaping and delivering the steel frames for the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, Battery Park City, the new Federal courthouse in Foley Square and numerous Manhattan skyscrapers.

But while Mr. Petrizzo projected a gentle, grandfatherly glow in conferences and lunches with construction industry executives and lawyers, Federal prosecutors and agents say there was also a darker side to him. At the same time that he ran four companies based in Keasbey, N.J., the authorities assert, Mr. Petrizzo was a Colombo crime family capo, plotting murders and rigging multimillion-dollar construction deals for New York's Mafia bosses.

This portrait of Mr. Petrizzo's double life has emerged over the last year since he was arrested in December 1993 and accused of participating in a mob war for control of the Colombo family.

Mr. Petrizzo, 61, who has been held without bail since his arrest, and five other suspected Colombo family members are scheduled for trial on Monday in Federal District Court in Brooklyn on charges of conspiracy to murder and firearms possession.

In addition, law enforcement officials said that Mr. Petrizzo is the target of other mob-related investigations. Search warrants obtained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation disclosed that he is suspected of extorting $1.3 million from a Swiss engineering company and camouflaging the payoffs as consulting fees. The warrants also indicated that the F.B.I. had evidence that Mr. Petrizzo's companies were used to launder illegal payoffs.

Despite the charges, more than 50 construction company executives, lawyers and relatives have rallied to Mr. Petrizzo's defense and written to Federal judges urging his release on bail. In court documents and in interviews, they maintain that Mr. Petrizzo had an unblemished business reputation and that he worked so exhaustingly for his companies -- 15 to 20 hours a day, six and seven days a week -- that he could never have found the time for Mafia crimes.

"He was one of the most sincere and honorable people I ever met in this business," said Karl W. Koch 3d, a steel industry consultant and the former vice president of the Karl Koch Erecting Company in Carteret, N.J. "There was never any threats or angles from him -- his services and word were like gold."

That view was echoed by Angelo R. Bisceglie Jr., who was Mr. Petrizzo's labor lawyer for three years.

"As a former prosecutor, you have a sixth sense for someone who might be connected," said Mr. Bisceglie, who was an assistant prosecutor in Essex and Morris Counties and a special counsel to former Gov. Jim Florio. "This man was a gentleman without the slightest hint of anything unsavory about him."

But at pretrial bail hearings over the last year, Federal prosecutors said that Mr. Petrizzo rode in convoys of Colombo gangsters in 1991 and 1992 hunting for rivals in a family war and that he was the Colombo representative on a Mafia council that controlled labor unions and divided the spoils from the construction industry.

George A. Stamboulidis, the lead prosecutor, maintained at the bail hearings that Mr. Petrizzo was promoted to the rank of capo, or captain, because he was the "liaison for the Colombo family on the organized-crime construction panel that has a stranglehold on the New York City-area construction industry."

Law enforcement officials say it is impossible to pinpoint the exact costs of what they say were Mr. Petrizzo's mob activities. But experts estimate that organized crime influence and payoffs inflate overall construction prices by about 10 percent through rigged bids and through honest competitors' being discouraged from seeking contracts.

At pretrial hearings, Mr. Stamboulidis also charged that Mr. Petrizzo used his office in Keasbey for underworld meetings and to store ammunition and disguises for hit men.

Mr. Petrizzo, who has pleaded not guilty and is being held at the Federal detention center in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, declined to be interviewed. But details of his life were gleaned from court and financial records and from interviews with lawyers, business associates and law enforcement officials.

He grew up in East New York, Brooklyn, and dropped out of school when he was 16 to work on a private garbage collection crew. Later, he was a truck driver and manager for freight companies. In 1969, at age 36, he began a steel hauling business, but the company failed in 1974.

In 1975, despite his previous business reverses, he formed a new company, A. J. Ross Logistics Inc., in Keasbey, in Middlesex County about 50 miles from Manhattan. The company's main business was making steel reinforcing bars and trucking steel columns and girders.

James M. LaRossa, Mr. Petrizzo's chief lawyer, said at a bail hearing and in an interview that Mr. Petrizzo founded the company with a loan of $5 million from Paul Milstein, a prominent New York real estate developer and builder.

But Nicholas Scoppetta, a lawyer for Mr. Milstein, said that Mr. Milstein denied that he or his company, the Milstein Properties Corporation, ever lent money to Mr. Petrizzo or his enterprises. According to Mr. Scoppetta, Milstein Properties's only significant transaction with Mr. Petrizzo were payments in 1985 and 1986 totaling $2.1 million for storing, shaping and delivering steel bars.

As A. J. Ross Logistics prospered, Mr. Petrizzo expanded his operations in Keasbey, forming new companies and obtaining subcontracting jobs on projects handled by construction industry giants like the Tishman Construction Company, Olympia & York and the HRH Corporation. Mr. Petrizzo's group supplied and reshaped steel for the I.B.M. Building, the World Financial Center, Worldwide Plaza, the Marriott Marquis Hotel and the South Street Seaport.

A. J. Ross's earnings peaked in 1989 at $54 million, with 354 employees on the payroll.

Federal investigators said that Mr. Petrizzo's prominence in the Colombo family rose with his business successes. At recent trials, Mafia defectors testified that in the late 1970's or early 1980's Mr. Petrizzo was inducted as a member of a unit in the Colombo family led by Alphonse Persico, the son of Carmine Persico, the family's boss. By 1987, the witnesses said, Mr. Petrizzo was a capo.

One of Mr. Petrizzo's four daughters, Joanne, married Michael Persico, the son of Carmine Persico, in 1983. They separated in 1991.

In June 1991, a deadly struggle erupted in the Colombo family between a faction loyal to Carmine Persico, who was serving a life sentence in prison, and Victor J. Orena, the acting boss. Prosecutors said that despite his daughter's marriage connection, Mr. Petrizzo sided with Mr. Orena in a war that resulted in the murders of at least 10 people.

Crime-family turncoats also testified at recent Federal racketeering and murder trials of reputed Colombo mobsters that Mr. Orena often met with Mr. Petrizzo and other Orena loyalists at Stella's Restaurant in Floral Park, L.I., to plan murders and settle Mafia disputes.

"We don't deny that Mr. Petrizzo certainly knew the people he is accused of conspiring with," Mr. LaRossa said. "But we are going to prove at the trial that he had nothing to do with any war or illegal activity."

In recent years, Mr. Petrizzo formed a close business affiliation with the New Jersey Steel Company in Sayreville, N.J, a company that converts scrap metal into steel. In 1988, New Jersey Steel, a subsidiary of the Swiss engineering company Von Roll A.G., bought a one-third share of A. J. Ross for $2 million.

Von Roll Transportation, another subsidiary of Von Roll A.G., hired Mr. Petrizzo as a consultant in 1989 for about $1.3 million to help build a $140 million monorail system at Newark International Airport.

Walter H. Beebe, a lawyer in Manhattan for Von Roll, and Robert J. Pasquarelli, the president of New Jersey Steel, said that Mr. Petrizzo was retained on the recommendation of Port Authority officials who suggested that the Swiss company needed someone with experience in the New Jersey construction field.

But Peter Yerkes, a spokesman for the authority, said it never recommends to general contractors which subcontractors to hire.

In 1993, New Jersey Steel also paid Mr. Petrizzo about $120,000 as a consultant for the modernization of its Sayreville plant.

Mr. Beebe said that Von Roll officials became concerned about Mr. Petrizzo after a report in The New York Times on May 9, 1993, said that he had been identified by two Mafia defectors as a Colombo capo who had obtained 11,000 tons of scrap metal from the West Side Highway in a deal that netted mob leaders $800,000 in illegal payoffs.

About 9,000 tons of the scrap metal were sold by Mr. Petrizzo to New Jersey Steel in 1989. In June 1993, KPMG Peat Marwick, the accounting firm, was asked by Von Roll to conduct an audit of New Jersey Steel's purchase of the scrap metal and of its other major contracts with A. J. Ross. The firm found no irregularities.

But in court warrants obtained in November 1993 to search Mr. Petrizzo's office in Keasbey and his condominium in Garden City, L.I., F.B.I. agents said they were seeking evidence connected to the extortion of $1.3 million from Von Roll and its subsidiaries, to the bribing of carpenters union officials linked to the West Side Highway scrap deal and to money laundering schemes.

So far, no additional charges have been brought against Mr. Petrizzo. Law enforcement officials said, however, that Federal prosecutors in New Jersey were awaiting the outcome of Mr. Petrizzo's trial in Brooklyn before seeking additional indictments against him.

Mr. Beebe, the Von Roll lawyer, denied that improper payments had been made to Mr. Petrizzo for the airport monorail contract. Mr. Pasquarelli of New Jersey Steel, however, acknowledged that his company had lost at least $7.3 million mainly through credit extended to A. J. Ross, which declared bankruptcy in November 1993.

"I still don't think Tom Petrizzo is guilty of anything," said Mr. Pasquarelli, who has visited Mr. Petrizzo in jail. " He was one of the hardest-working, nonconfrontational guys I ever met."

Correction: April 12, 1995, Wednesday A caption yesterday with a picture showing Thomas J. Petrizzo at the wake of a reputed mobster misidentified him in some editions. Mr. Petrizzo, who faces trial on charges linked to mob killings, was in the center, getting into a car.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

The Laborers Network
In reply to this post by Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
http://www.thelaborers.net/whatsnew.htm

Feb 12, 2005 Local 734 faces U.S. probe of graft. Crimedawg sends audio file of scumbag attorney ANGELO R. BISCEGLIE, JR to DOJ as evidence of retaliation and threats against union member's free speech. Vergalito's social security number appears on a public court document  and McGough is not going to stop web publishing public hard to obtain documents no matter what mob attorneys or mobsters threaten.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

NOYB
...."The facts disclosed in this record are a disgrace to the labor movement,"
said Vaira, who ordered his findings forwarded to the FBI and U.S. attorney
for New Jersey.

But Angelo R. Bisceglie Jr., another attorney representing Local 734
officials, said the trustees' case will be refuted when his clients get to
make their case in U.S. District Court next month.

"We're looking forward to the court hearing. That's when it will all come
out," he said.
__________________________________________________________


http://www.boatbanter.com/showthread.php?t=26867&page=2
January 13th 05, 02:30 PM
NOYB
external usenet poster

...."Helping hand" you say?
Lawsuit says corruption rampant in Jersey union
No-show jobs, nepotism, mob ties cited

Thursday, January 13, 2005
BY TED SHERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

Some of the highest-paying jobs at Local 734 of the Laborers' International
Union of North America -- which represents thousands of workers in New
Jersey and Pennsylvania -- had little to do with digging ditches.

There was the wife of one former union official, who was hired after her
husband was convicted on federal labor law violations for attempting to
create a no-show job. She received $111,799 to come in twice a week to
listen to voice mail messages from members with benefits questions,
according to court records.



Then there was the accountant who paid his mother-in-law $650 a week for
part-time work as a bookkeeper while charging the local's pension and
welfare funds $182,000 a year for her services, an independent hearing
officer concluded.

And the business partner of another former official who was hired as the
office manager of a satellite office at the Jersey Shore and paid $123,500
to supervise two people.

The Laborers' union now is seeking a federal investigation into the New
Jersey local, claiming that members were defrauded of more than $2 million
in a scheme that saw the hiring of relatives and business cronies to perform
"non-essential, part-time and ruse jobs at grossly excessive salaries."

Trustees for the Washington, D.C.-based union -- who are seeking damages
from current and former officials, and want to remove the leadership of the
local -- also alleged that some officials of the local who controlled
millions in funds had ties to organized crime.

The Laborers' union, with more than 850,000 members across the United States
and Canada, represents mostly building or highway construction workers, but
its members also work in public employment, environmental remediation,
health care, food service and custodial services. Local 734, with business
offices in Rochelle Park, has 3,500 members in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

In a lawsuit filed last week in U.S. District Court in Newark, the trustees
said Local 734 was riddled with no-show jobs and ill-defined, overpaid
positions -- many of them connected to former executive board member August
"Auggie" Vergalito, who left the local after he pleaded guilty in 1997 to
unlawfully concealing payments he made from the welfare and educational
fund.

Among those who benefited included his wife, a daughter, three sons-in-law,
a former son-in-law and two business associates, the lawsuit claimed.

Attorneys for some of the Local 734 officials named in the complaint
yesterday denied there were abuses within the pension and welfare funds.

"They are asserting that the funds hired people who were really not
essential, and paid them too much. We are asserting they all had a
particular function with the fund, and were paid a higher salary to keep
them," said David Grossman, an attorney for Peter Rizzo, the local's funds
administrator.

Grossman said the union's trustees were trying to take over the two funds,
which total more than $100 million, and merge them with other funds that are
not doing so well.

"That's what it's all about. It's a money grab," Grossman said.

Vincent M. Giblin, an attorney for the trustees, however, said it was all
about fraud. He said it was inconceivable that the officials of the local
did not know that inflated salaries were going to nonessential jobs.

"Nepotism is not a license to commit fraud," Giblin said.

In New Jersey, an independent hearing officer for the union, Peter F. Vaira,
the former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, concluded
that most of the jobs held by Vergalito's family and friends were of little
value to the union's operation. He called it a scheme to defraud the funds
and Local 734.

For example, he noted that Jamie Dolan -- a daughter of Vergalito who was
married to Edward Dolan, a Local 734 official -- was hired as a confidential
officer for the local after her husband was convicted in 1995 on federal
embezzlement charges.

Jamie Dolan's job required her to be on call from Friday through Monday, and
listen to voice mail messages from members trying to resolve benefits
questions.

"In reality, she came into the office and took the messages off the voice
mail two days a week," Vaira found. In 2003, she responded to 109 calls --
earning a salary of $111,799.

"This averages to approximately two calls per week, at approximately $1,000
a call," Vaira said in his findings, which were filed with the federal
lawsuit.

According to Vaira, Vergalito's wife, Rhoda, was employed as a Local 734
confidential officer to replace her husband when he was forced to leave,
initially for a salary of $1,000 a week to work from 5:30 p.m. to midnight
Tuesday through Friday.

Vaira also cited the hiring of Isaac Barocus, a business partner of
Vergalito in a taxi and limousine service, to become the office manager of a
satellite office in Brick.

"Barocus was paid $123,500 to oversee two other persons whose duties were at
best minimal," Vaira said.

Two other women were employed as clerks for 10 hours a week at $47 per hour.

According to Vaira's finding, "grossly excessive salaries for nonessential
or part-time jobs" resulted in the local's welfare pension fund spending 40
cents of every dollar for administrative costs. The normal administrative
costs are between 7 percent and 10 percent, he said.

The hearing officer also raised questions about the local's connections to
organized crime. According to Vaira, Vergalito was observed by an FBI
surveillance team entering the Soho Grand Hotel in New York about the same
time as Dominick Cirillo, identified then as the acting boss of the Genovese
crime family. He said Vergalito was seen at the hotel on at least 13
separate occasions in 1999 -- often on Wednesdays -- and was seen in the
company of Cirillo at the hotel bar at least once.

"The facts disclosed in this record are a disgrace to the labor movement,"
said Vaira, who ordered his findings forwarded to the FBI and U.S. attorney
for New Jersey.

But Angelo R. Bisceglie Jr., another attorney representing Local 734
officials, said the trustees' case will be refuted when his clients get to
make their case in U.S. District Court next month.

"We're looking forward to the court hearing. That's when it will all come
out," he said.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

STAR-LEDGER STAFF
In reply to this post by Carlo Tresca
April 10, 2002: "...One figure who sources say is "a guy to watch" is Thomas Petrizzo, a Middlesex County contractor who authorities maintain lived a double life as a successful businessman and a capo in the Colombo family.

Petrizzo admitted in 1996 he defrauded the company selected to build the Newark International Airport monorail out of $1.2 million. One source said, "He is one of the sharpest guys in the business," a man who represented a "critical link" between the underworld and legitimate business. Petrizzo denied the allegation that he has mob ties. He is scheduled for release in January."
______________________________________


http://www.nj.com/sopranos/ledger/index.ssf?/sopranos/stories/mafiosi_20020410sl.html

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Sopranos' creator David Chase revealed that the story arc of Season 5 was inspired by a Star-Ledger article on the RICO trials of the '80s. We've combed our archives and believe this may be the article he was referring to.)

Jersey mob soon to get infusion of old blood

Lawmen are wary as jail terms end

April 10, 2002

BY ROBERT RUDOLPH AND GUY STERLING
STAR-LEDGER STAFF

"Richie the Boot" Boiardo, Anthony "Little Pussy" Russo, "Sam the Plumber" DeCavalcante and the other legendary Mafia bosses who once ruled organized crime in New Jersey with the power of feudal warlords have long since gone to their final rewards.

Many of their replacements, such as Genovese family underboss "Bobby" Manna - who once planned a daring but unsuccessful hit on Gambino don John Gotti - have been sentenced to jail terms expected to keep them behind bars for the rest of their lives.

As a result, the mob - which once controlled entire cities and boasted, "We own New Jersey" - has been crippled. Its influence in labor unions has waned, and its stranglehold on the docks has been loosened. Other groups have moved in to dominate the drug trade and even have made inroads in the gambling and loan-sharking businesses. Inevitably, however, some of those who went in must come out. Within the next 18 months, nearly a dozen reputed organized crime figures - convicted and jailed during the big Mafia crackdowns of the 1980s and early '90s - are due to step back onto the streets.

How these men handle their newfound freedom could shape the Mafia in New Jersey for years to come, organized crime experts say. State and federal officials will be watching closely to see which ones get back in the game and which ones have learned their lesson.

"A guy who was a big-time shooter when he went in has some choices to make," said Brian Taylor, a former FBI agent who for years headed the bureau's New York City organized crime section. "He could retire, just fade away, or he could take a run for the position he had. It all depends on the individual."

One mob boss due for release is Tino Fiumara, the powerful Genovese family chieftain so feared by colleagues that he was rarely referred to by name - only as "T" or "the good-looking guy."

In his prime, Fiumara controlled much of the Newark waterfront for the Genovese family. Stories of his quick temper and refusal ever to be outdone are still told by guys on the outside.

He was linked by law enforcement authorities to numerous murders, including the piano-wire strangulation of an associate and the shooting of a childhood friend, when he was convicted of racketeering in the early 1980s. He was released on parole in 1999, but federal agents succeeded in sending him back to jail for associating with known felons, a violation of his parole terms.

Fiumara is slated for release again in June, and both law enforcement and organized crime are bracing for his return.

"He is one of the smartest and most ruthless mob figures New Jersey has ever produced," said one mob expert. "He is the kind of guy who could pick up right where he left off."

In the months to come, Fiumara will be finding himself among increasingly familiar company.

One of his friends, Michael "Tona" Borelli of Fort Lee, avoided jail after promising a state court judge to stay away from crime.

Giacomo "Jackie" DiNorscio, best remembered for engineering a series of scams while serving time in state prison by running an unauthorized phone line into his cell, is scheduled to be released from federal custody by September 2003.

Gerald "Jerry the Jew" Cohen, who once was a close associate of DiNorscio, will taste freedom in January.

Nicholas Mitarotonda, 64, who authorities say is likely to take over the Gambino operations in New Jersey, is slated to walk out of prison shortly after Christmas, and five reputed members of Gotti's North Jersey Gambino operation are already back on the streets after serving time for a variety of crimes.

And in the next several years others will be given their walking papers from prison.

For example, Raymond Tango Jr., another old-time Fiumara associate who was sentenced to 20 years to life for gunning down William Earl Mann in a fusillade of more than 20 bullets in the parking lot of the Sheraton Inn in Elizabeth, will be eligible for release in three years.

The releases, say law enforcement sources, are not coordinated; they are merely a coincidence bound to happen given the large number of organized crime figures jailed over the last two decades.

Many of them are no more than midlevel soldiers, but Fiumara is different. He was a rising star when he went to prison, law enforcement officials say, and he could be again.

Robert Buccino, a former State Police intelligence officer who became the state's top mob expert, says Fiumara is one of the few New Jersey mobsters who has the talent and ability to wrest control an organized crime family and run it successfully.

"He did his time, he's highly respected, and he's got the leadership qualities," Buccino said.

Fiumara was originally sentenced to 25 years as a result of federal convictions in New Jersey and New York for extortion and racketeering. Until his conviction, authorities had pegged Fiumara as next in line to head the Genovese family, the dominant mob organization in New Jersey and New York.

But it is not certain whether even Fiumara's fearsome reputation can ensure his return to power.

STRANGE NEW WORLD

Robert Carroll, the former chief of the state Organized Crime and Racketeering Bureau, says criminals who have been incarcerated for a long time must cope with a whole new battery of sophisticated law enforcement surveillance tactics, ranging from DNA testing to satellite tracking. And the very nature of organized crime has been shifting as well, moving away from the Prohibition-era legacy of tommy gun slaughters to a more subtle and lucrative style that favors corruption and payoffs over strong-arming.

"It's a strange new world out there," said veteran defense attorney Cathy Waldor, past president of the state Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys. Organized crime "is a lot more sophisticated; it's driven more by corporate crime or drugs."

"I don't know that after all that time in prison, some people will be able to adapt," Waldor added.

Still, Buccino says the odds of a mob figure gracefully slipping into a quiet old age are slim.

"The rules of organized crime are that you don't quit or retire," he said. "You're born into the family; that's part of the whole ritual."

Kevin McCarthy, chief of the Organized Crime Strike Force in the U.S. Attorney's Office, said: "Usually, older people are less likely to commit crimes when they are released from prison - except for mob guys. They commit crimes no matter how old they are, and they tend to move up in the hierarchy the older they get."

One figure who sources say is "a guy to watch" is Thomas Petrizzo, a Middlesex County contractor who authorities maintain lived a double life as a successful businessman and a capo in the Colombo family.

Petrizzo admitted in 1996 he defrauded the company selected to build the Newark International Airport monorail out of $1.2 million. One source said, "He is one of the sharpest guys in the business," a man who represented a "critical link" between the underworld and legitimate business. Petrizzo denied the allegation that he has mob ties. He is scheduled for release in January.

Some groups remain decimated after a wave of prosecutions eviscerated their New Jersey operations during the past decade.

John Riggi, head of the DeCavalcante family for years, had been slated for release this year, only to be kept in jail by charges linking him to a series of decades-old murders. Some of those charges are based in part on information from his own son-in-law, who turned informant.

The boss, underboss and consigliere of the Lucchese family in New Jersey, Michael Taccetta, Michael Perna and Martin Taccetta, are doing terms that could keep them in jail until 2016.

The ranking Gambino boss, Robert "Cabert" Bisaccia of Belleville, remains behind bars on a murder charge stemming from testimony provided by notorious Gotti turncoat Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano, and Gotti is himself reported on his death bed.

Despite their losses, Edwin Stier, a former state director of criminal justice, warned, "Organized crime is still a problem in New Jersey."

"Unless we continue fighting it, it's going to become a serious problem again," Stier said.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

Tim Robbins
In reply to this post by Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
...Zarzana's attorney, Angelo Bisceglie, said his client appreciated the gesture. "Sal feels that Fred is a stand-up guy," he said.

http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/news/1999/12/06/1999-12-06_embezzle-case_ex-union_chief.html

EMBEZZLE-CASE EX-UNION CHIEF BACKS HOPEFUL

BY TOM ROBBINS

Monday, December 6th 1999, 2:11AM

Former carpenters union chief Fred Devine isn't letting his embezzlement conviction stand in the way of endorsing a candidate in the union's election.

Devine was convicted last year of pilfering more than $50,000 from the District Council of Carpenters, spending the money on a high life of jet trips and girlfriends. He was sentenced to 15 months but is free pending appeal.

The union, under national trusteeship since 1996, is holding elections for top officers.

Devine - absent from union politics since the trusteeship was imposed - jumped back in with a letter backing a tough-talking Brooklyn carpenter named Sal Zarzana, one of six candidates seeking to lead the 25,000-member organization.

In a blue-and-white glossy mailing, Devine hails Zarzana, 35, as "the only candidate who can rebuild this union." The flyer offers a free round trip to the polls Friday, when carpenters are to vote at Manhattan Community College on Chambers St.

"Fred can arrange to pick you up at your home in a luxury van and drive you to the polling place and back home. Refreshments will be served," the flyer says.

Devine, reached at his seaside home in New Jersey, was asked how he was going to handle all those rides.

"I don't know anything about that. That was added later. I just wrote the letter," he said.

"I did a lot of good when I was with the union. My conviction was strictly political," he added.

Zarzana's attorney, Angelo Bisceglie, said his client appreciated the gesture.

"Sal feels that Fred is a stand-up guy," he said.

The national carpenters union disagrees. In a civil suit reported here last week, national President Douglas McCarron has accused Devine and others of putting the union in a potential $500 million hole by promising pension and other benefits beyond the union's ability to pay.

Zarzana's strongest opponent in the race to lead the union is Michael Forde, who heads the 7,000-member Local 608. Forde has his own problems, however. The local is at the center of an ongoing state and federal corruption investigation involving sweetheart deals for mob contractors.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

former1456
In reply to this post by Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
is this guy kidding i just herd from a nydc buisness rep that we are not talking to the gca because he is promising a 33 percent give back.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

RichardDorrough
In reply to this post by Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
Here is the Boss/Scab "Union" Richard Dourrough & Robert Kweisinski are pushing:

First: it is Dorrough jack off

Second I am NOT pushing Amalgamated Carpenters and do not agree with some of the choices they have made. I do however wish the Rank and File of Amalgamated the best of luck.
 
Third : There is not now and there never was any 33% give back in wages and you and the others who have been spewing this shit are liars and UBC assclowns.The % of savings mentioned always has been and still is anticipated savings to the contractors by eliminating the UBC scum and UBC mismanagement from the equation.You can get the real details from amalgamated themselves. NEVER has anybody said they were giving  ANY wages back so that makes you a liar as usual.Instead of posting your spew and pretending to be Bisgellie why dont you actually contact him and post his response. But you wont because then your exposed as a liar and all you want to do is post UBC propaganda spew anyways.You reek of desperation assclown  

Fourth: I will ask you that if all your bad boy BS your posting on Amalgamated was any more than UBC propaganda spew how come the US Attorneys office is not controlling his office and Amalgamated is not under a consent decree and controlled by an RO and Judge AS YOUR NYC UBC is.Its funny how you running your yap yet the criminals and scum are in your house and you cant get them out can you. Why dont you post on some of the glorious UBC Lawyers such as Harold Ickes or one of the many pond scum employed by your UBC. Look at the LM2 and see the well over 1 million you paid to Walsh because your infested with scum and corruption..Your a joke.Your people make Bisqecelli look like a boy scout
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
It's "Bisceglie", jack-off!
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

RichardDorrough
It's "Bisceglie", jack-off!  I could care less jack off.Thats the point
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
I could care less that you care less, King jack-off!
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

RichardDorrough
ZZZZzzz Cmon is this all you got assclown
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

Wall & Ceiling
In reply to this post by Angelo R. Bisceglie, Jr., Esq.
If those idiots dont sign full mobility at the nycdc Angelo we are in! No more harrassment by those rats at the district council! They robbed us for 20yrs. and enough is enough! Not going to let this dictator Walsh run our organization! All the big drywall contractors are ready! Walsh is a bigger crook then forde was! atleast with mike and the wise guys the men went to work! Fuck walsh fuck firth fuck danielson! I have enuf work signed for the next 18 months my builders would love a 20% reduction! See Yah council you will be broke in 5yrs.
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

nyc carpenter
In reply to this post by RichardDorrough
hey richard,what are the choices the amalgamated made that you dont agree with?i was considering joining their movement because im fed up with the ubc bullshit.what do you think  are the pro's and con's of amalgamated?
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

nyc carpenter
In reply to this post by RichardDorrough
hey richard,what are the choices the amalgamated made that you dont agree with?i was considering joining their movement because im fed up with the ubc bullshit.what do you think  are the pro's and con's of amalgamated?
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

question for richard dorrough
In reply to this post by RichardDorrough
what choices did amalgamated make that you dont agree with?
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

Still moving forward
Richard your local union #1 seems to be dead in the water. So tell us what do you think the pros and cons are? And tell us what went wrong with local #1?
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Re: Amalgamated Carpenters

RichardDorrough
Before I answer you tell me "why" you think Local#1 is dead in the water.

Second If you want to talk to me post your name.Why must you hide if you want to have an open and honest discussion
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