“300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

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“300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Bill Walsh
I think the ignominy of the U.B.C.’s criteria of over 2000 work hours per year mandating what one must achieve to be a future leader and join the exclusive “300 Hitters Club” is reprehensible. The “Building Leadership for a Strong Future” program created by the U.B.C. and supported by the NYCDCC, is overlooking all the hard working Carpenters that are really the ones doing the heavy lifting for our union. Sure, it’s nice to invite all the company Foreman, Supers and steady company workers out for a member paid, tour of the facilities in Vegas, eight months before the 2015 General Convention but what is the real agenda?

How many of these “future leaders” attend their local union meetings, have ever been on the out of work list or had to go on unemployment to feed their families? Do these “leaders” relate to what the rank and file members deal with on a daily basis accepting PLA’s and working harder, for less money? They are out of touch with the real work force in our union and enjoy the perks of being a company “full mobility” “full time” employee.

The history of the U.B.C. and the Labor movement, communications workshops, teaching mentoring skills, meeting with UBC Officers, and discussing the vision of the future of the Union is something that should be happening for all members, not only the chosen few lucky enough to stay employed. Real leadership would figure out a way to reach out to all of the membership with this vision and not believe one can learn it in a three day seminar and become a “leader”.

Leaders can emerge from the most unlikely of places as long as we provide the opportunity, experience, and training for all. All for one, one for all. God bless the U.B.C.

Bill Walsh
Local 157
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
I'd rather be blind than to see your eyes. I'd rather be deaf than to hear your lies. I'd rather be broke than to sell my soul. I gave you my all but you'll never know.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

√
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
Would that we could grant the little turd outsider his wish
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

alpineto
How about all the the guys who work on the
outside who miss time due to the weather  
this rule has to go or there will be a law suit
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Hammer
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
300 hitters club..what a joke.
Never had 2,000 hours in 20 years.
How about the 4,000 guys on the out of work list for the last 2,000 hours...what can we do for them.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Retired
Hey, am I reading this correctly? How many members agree with Mr. Bill and his feelings that guys who are working steady aren't "real" members? That somehow you need to have been on the owl, or your earning the ability to become a "Shop" man, or foreman is a bad thing.
    This divisive speech about others that worked hard to achieve success is an ongoing  thorn in the possible growth of members coming together. Yes I know there are exceptions on the two types of employment opportunities available to union members, but knocking one over the other with broad strokes is NOT the way to a more unified membership.
    Some feel ALL shop men bend for the owners. This is another of many stereotypes that are false. The same can be said of some "shop men" saying ALL owl members are lazy and unskilled.
    I've witnessed all these name calling events for the 30 years I was active. Each member who is worth their salt is a worthy of a pat on the back, and at least from this retired member, a big thank you for your hard work and willingness to contribute all hours to support members who paved the way for you!  God Bless the one who speaks encouragement, not criticism.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

608 hater
irish shyte destroyed the union
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Bill K
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
Yes Bill this is all part of the plan for 70 percent market share. After all men who work 1500 to 1700 hrs arent good union men. They must be insufficient to this UBC and NYCDCC. That will motivate everyone to show up for the pickets by excluding them from a say in their future. I guess 2000 hr men are beholden to their company and wont dare ask Doug THE THIEF McCarron any qu8estions that arent scrpited and embarrass him in any way. The New York executives cant have Doug embarrassed our else they wont get those 10000.00 dollar bonuses that Doug hands out while they make you work for less. Anyone who votes for Joe Geiger agaain is out of their mind and will deeply regret their decision in the near future. Remember NERCC vacation pay is 2.00 per hr and they sign agreements to let you the member work for 70 percent pay while they get the bonuses.300 hitter is kind of an insult to a member that gives a hundred percent everyday wouldn't you agree?
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Bill K
In reply to this post by Retired
How many 2000 hou8r members go to union meetings and do picket dutys sir?How many of them work thru lunch and never think of letting another member have the overtime so they can feed their family? Isnt a union man supposed to help one another? Or is your union hooray for me and too bad for the next man? Theyre are very few company man who think anything good about the union and quite frankly they dont examine the situations at their local unions cause theyre too busy working. I guess it feels good for a member who pays 25000.00 dollars for health benefits that are the worst in unionized construction. maybe if the 2000 hour guys had the balls to come to a meeting and speak their mind our benefits would be better?
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
The truth is only a small percentage ever work enough hours to earn benefits year after year. And although 100% of union employees  payroll deduction  goes to the benefit and pension + other funds , they end up being "feeders" of the trough. With enough "feeders", benefit funds are needled out through a priority process, and some even on a 30 day net, to pay trivial benefit expenses, while other medical procedures costing big $$ are actually payed out over time in installments, in an effort to maximize earnings in delicate and broad investment funding procedures. The name of this game is playing high risk investment games, and taking in as much as possible $$ through payroll deductions, while balancing payouts in long as possible payment structures. Whatever you call this "club", you can bet it is a devious promotion to cause dissention among the ranks,  to keep them slanted towards each other, and unable to see the real problem: that of the 99% being led around by the nose by the 1%, and the grand illusion of who the true masters of the UBC are, (the rank and file) if they are ever awoken to lead themselves ....  
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Malbec
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
Heard that you don't need 2000 hours. Sounds like sour grapes to me.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Retired
In reply to this post by Bill K
Bill, your philosophy of "those that have should give to those that don't", shows where you ought to live. The last time I looked we are free to succeed or fail in this country, and if we choose to make use of our hard earned money to help the needy, we can. We are not mandated yet! Look in the mirror and ask yourself if you are the best you can be. If not, you are responsible for you, not everyone else you like to blame.
    I believe in personnel responsibility is being kicked to the curb, and more and more want or think they deserve something for nothing.  
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Bill K
I guess union doesnt mean solidarity to you. I think you should take a look around cause im not blaming im just stating the facts retired. I guess my 2000 hr years shouldnt pay your medical benefits according to your hard work philosiphy. i live in America retired its supposed to be a democracy but it sure plays like a facist regime giving it all the fruit to buisness and for the working class all the rinds they cant eat .
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
sol·i·dar·i·ty
ˌsäləˈde(ə)ritē/Submit
noun
1.
unity or agreement of feeling or action, especially among individuals with a common interest; mutual support within a group.
"factory workers voiced solidarity with the striking students"
synonyms: unanimity, unity, like-mindedness, agreement, accord, harmony, consensus, concurrence, cooperation, cohesion, fraternity, mutual support; formalconcord
"our solidarity is what gives us the credibility and power to make changes"
2.
an independent trade union movement in Poland that developed into a mass campaign for political change and inspired popular opposition to communist regimes across eastern Europe during the 1980s.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
When good god fearing men feel like it's time for a change, change will occur.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
The claim is often made that the Bible approves of slavery, implicating God as its supporter, since rules governing slavery can be found in the both the Old and New Testament. Since virtually everyone agrees that forced, involuntary servitude is morally wrong, how can Christians justify the Bible's apparent support of slavery?

What the Old Testament says about slavery
First, we must recognize that the Bible does not say God supports slavery. In fact, the slavery described in the Old Testament was quite different from the kind of slavery we think of today - in which people are captured and sold as slaves. According to Old Testament law, anyone caught selling another person into slavery was to be executed:

"He who kidnaps a man, whether he sells him or he is found in his possession, shall surely be put to death." (Exodus 21:16)

So, obviously, slavery during Old Testament times was not what we commonly recognize as slavery, such as that practiced in the 17th century Americas, when Africans were captured and forcibly brought to work on plantations. Unlike our modern government welfare programs, there was no safety-net for ancient Middle Easterners who could not provide a living for themselves. In ancient Israel, people who could not provide for themselves or their families sold them into slavery so they would not die of starvation or exposure. In this way, a person would receive food and housing in exchange for labor.

 The Irrational Atheist by Vox DaySo, although there are rules about slavery in the Bible, those rules exist to protect the slave. Injuring or killing slaves was punishable - up to death of the offending party.1 Hebrews were commanded not to make their slave work on the Sabbath,2 slander a slave,3 have sex with another man's slave,4 or return an escaped slave.5 A Hebrew was not to enslave his fellow countryman, even if he owed him money, but was to have him work as a hired worker, and he was to be released in 7 years or in the year of jubilee (which occurred every 50 years), whichever came first.6 In fact, the slave owner was encouraged to "pamper his slave".7

What the New Testament says about slavery
Since many of the early Christians were slaves to Romans,8 they were encouraged to become free if possible, but not worry about it if not possible.9 The Roman empire practiced involuntary slavery, so rules were established for Christians who were subject to this slavery or held slaves prior to becoming Christians. The rules established for slaves were similar to those established for other Christians with regard to being subject to governing authorities.10 Slaves were told to be obedient to their master and serve them sincerely, as if serving the Lord Himself.11 Paul instructed slaves to serve with honor, so that Christianity would not be looked down upon.12

As with slaves, instructions were given to their masters as to how they were to treat their slaves. For example, they were not to be threatened,13 but treated with justice and fairness.14 The text goes on to explain that this was to be done because God is the Master of all people, and does not show partiality on the basis of social status or position.13, 14

There is an interesting letter in the New Testament (Philemon15-21) that gives some insight into the problems encountered in the early Christian church regarding the issue of slavery. Paul, the author of the letter, is writing from a Roman prison awaiting trial.15 He is writing to Philemon, who runs a local Christian church out of his house16 (since Christianity was highly persecuted at this point in time). Philemon, we find out, is the master of the slave Onesimus, who has escaped but has been converted to Christianity by Paul.18 In the letter, Paul indicates that he is sending Onesimus back to Philemon.19 However, Paul says that he has confidence that Philemon will "do what is proper"17 although Paul wants him to do it by his "own free will".20 Even so, Paul indicates that Onesimus would be a great aid in helping him spread the gospel.19 Paul ends the letter by saying that he has "confidence in your obedience" and indicates that he knows Philemon "will do even more than what I say."21 Although Paul did not directly order Philemon to release Onesimus from slavery, it would have been difficult to come away with any other conclusion from his letter.

God does not distinguish between slaves and freemen
 7 Truths that Changed the World: Discovering Christianity's Most Dangerous IdeasContrary to the claims of many skeptics, the New Testament proclaims that all people are equal in the eyes of God - even slaves:

There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. (Galatians 3:28)
knowing that whatever good thing each one does, this he will receive back from the Lord, whether slave or free. (Ephesians 6:8)
And masters, do the same things to them, and give up threatening, knowing that both their Master and yours is in heaven, and there is no partiality with Him. (Ephesians 6:9)
a renewal in which there is no distinction between Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave and freeman, but Christ is all, and in all. (Colossians 3:11)
Conclusion Top of page
The idea that God or Christianity encourages or approves of slavery is shown to be false. In fact, anybody who was caught selling another person into slavery was to be executed. However, since voluntary slavery was widely practiced during biblical times, the Bible proscribes laws to protect the lives and health of slaves. Paul, the author of many of the New Testament writings, virtually ordered the Christian Philemon to release his Christian slave from his service to "do what is proper". In addition, numerous verses from the New Testament show that God values slaves as much as any free person and is not partial to anyone's standing before other people.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh

The Torah permits slavery ( Leviticus 25:44). On the other hand, Proverbs 3:17 states, in reference to wisdom, “Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.” In that case, how can the Torah, the embodiment of divine wisdom, condone the evil of slavery?

I believe the answer is that slavery is not essentially evil.

Generally slavery occurs under certain specific conditions. First of all, there must be a high demand for unskilled labor. Second of all, there must be a large community of primitive people available who can be forced, with minimal supervision, to do that labor.

In ancient Rome, slaves were often German barbarians. In medieval Europe Slavs were often enslaved and the English word “slave” comes from them. In modern times, Europeans enslaved black Africans. I believe that generally, slaves were far more primitive technologically than their masters since otherwise it would be difficult to capture them and perhaps even more difficult to make them work without payment. Educated people tend to find ways to malinger, escape or revolt. They will only work under heavy guard, which is expensive and therefore negates the benefit of using slaves. (This probably was the real reason closing the Soviet labor camps in the 1950’s.)

Therefore, we see that slavery tended to introduce primitive people to more advanced societies and thereby to spread civilization. Seemingly, slavery is similar to colonialism and it often existed in connection with colonialism. Colonialism could be brutal, however it could be benign as well. The same may be true of slavery. I would not say that slave traders and slave owners were exactly Peace Corp volunteers, however that may not be so far from the truth.

Witness the results of slavery in modern times. Although I do not condone the unneeded cruelty of some American slave owners, and neither does Judaism, however if not for slavery, millions of blacks would not be enjoying a comfortable life in America. People like the Reverend Jeremiah Wright may be filled with hatred for white Americans, however perhaps they should have a little gratitude also. What type life style do their never enslaved cousins in Africa have? In fact, even when held as slaves, many blacks enjoyed a decent standard of living. The net result of slavery over history has probably been positive.

Within Judaism, slavery meant that the slave had a semi-Jewish status (he would be circumcised if male, observe the Sabbath, but not attend synagogue) and and upon being freed, which inevitably happened eventually to the slave or his descendants, he became a full-fledged Jew. There can be little doubt that the ancestors of many modern Jews were at one time slaves owned by Jews. Slavery therefore was a means to spiritually enlighten primitive gentiles. Apparently because of this, the Catholic Church fought repeatedly against the Jewish ownership of gentile slaves.
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
Without knowledge of fear, we cannot know order in personality or society. Fear forms an ineluctable part of the human condition. Fear lacking, hope and aspiration fail. To demand for mankind “freedom from fear,” as politically attainable, was a silly piece of demagogic sophistry. If, per impossible, fear were wiped altogether out of our lives, we would be desperately bored, yearning for old or new terrors; vegetating, we would cease to be human beings. A child’s fearful joy in stories of goblins, witches, and ghosts is a natural yearning after the challenge of the dreadful: raw head and bloody bones, in one form or another, the imagination demands…. A Michigan farmer, some years ago, climbed to the roof of his silo, and there he painted, in great red letters that the Deity could see, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom…” http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2011/03/rarity-of-god-fearing-man.html
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Re: “300 Hitters Club” 2,000 hours for calendar year 2013, Really?

Ethics
In reply to this post by Bill Walsh
Sincere God-fearing men, I believe, are now a scattered remnant. Yet as it was with Isaiah, so it may yet be with us, that disaster brings consciousness of that stubborn remnant and brings, too, a renewed knowledge of the source of wisdom. Truth and hardihood may find a lodging in some modern hearts when the new schoolmen and the parsons, or some of them, are brought to confess that it is a terrible thing to be delivered into the hands of the living God…


Some men just want to work, and not be bothered by the politics, or religion. Most men believe that god looks out for them in the entirety of their working lives, and god will intervene when the time is right . Well my brothers, this is that time.
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Re: The turd teaches?

∫
So now the little turd who steals our chat box is trying to justify what he's doing with random bible quotes? When the church of the little turd opens he can preach the message of the turd, attend if you choose.
The web site and blog of the church of the turd should be his pulpit not this New York Carpenter blog.
Bill W. has his own ideas of what our union must be to be his best of all possible worlds, we can agree or disagree. If Bill runs for office vote for or against him. Is the shrinking membership of Bill W's clubs the opinion of their members?  
Read the comments posted, are they the opinion of the missing or just those of those who think that the union is their playpen?